Heading To Guaymas!

Not enough investment. And I think I remember that the government wasn't cooperating as well as they could have.

Mikey: It is not a matter of investment nor government cooperation from my viewpoint. As a matter of fact, if we sum up all the money the Federal Government of Mexico has invested on Monteforte's research program (including salaries starting from 1991) they have easily invested many times more that what we have since 1994, when we began this as a very modest research program.
 
I was short-circuited a bit by the number of rings crowded together in one case, then another, with rather indifferent settings. It was too crowded and my eye bounced around and couldn?t settle on just one of the choir of little mabes clamoring for my attention.
I wish they were separated with more space between them- in less crowded cases with the emphasis on the mabes themselves. Each one has a different part of the spectrum. Each mabe is complex in and of itself and deserves space enough to expand to its full glory without the others crowding in on the edges.

Yes, you are right about this. But it is the best way we can display as many items as possible and in the fastest time as well, before the tourists are sweeped away to their buses... we only have 40 minutes before they leave.

By the way, I just wanted to say that I feel honored for the poem you dedicated to us. We may have many happy visitors to our farm, but this is the first time someone has dedicated a lovely poem. Thank You Caitlin :)
 

Attachments

  • Atardecer en BB (13) [640x480].jpg
    Atardecer en BB (13) [640x480].jpg
    18.6 KB · Views: 43
Ooooh, how beautiful! How large are the earrings? Now a bunch of P-Gers wish they had sent a shopping list with you! Does the farm do any online sales?

Edited to say. I found the online shop. See Post #83.

US did not even ask if you have anything to declare except certain fruits and a munitions/dope check by a dog.

Getting there is not that hard. Take a plane from Tucson at about $500 each way. Stay in a hotel in San Carlos, which is touristy and English is understood by many. Take the bus tour to the Cortez Pearl Farm.

Or take the bus from Tucson for about $40. each way. The bus was clean modern comfortable. I heard Mexico has the best bus system in the world. The bus stop in Guaymas is across the street from the Hotel Armida and down about 40 yards. The Hotel Armida starts at about $70 for economy. We shared so it was half that.

A rented car helped once we got there. It allowed us to eat the best food!!! But the hotel people do not understand English. I am glad we could call on Jeremy to help us with the desk. If you don't have a Spanish speaker with you, staying in San Carlos is a better bet.
 

Attachments

  • Guaymas trip March 2010 006.JPG
    Guaymas trip March 2010 006.JPG
    108.3 KB · Views: 33
Last edited:
Mikey: It is not a matter of investment nor government cooperation from my viewpoint. As a matter of fact, if we sum up all the money the Federal Government of Mexico has invested on Monteforte's research program (including salaries starting from 1991) they have easily invested many times more that what we have since 1994, when we began this as a very modest research program.
No argument here. You would know more then I would about it. I was offering to help at the time and had some friends from Japan and Australia who had some interest in seeding etc. But for some reason things just seemed to be sticky in La Paz. I honestly don't remember all the details. It was a few years ago now.
Sounds like there is some history there with you and them. I don't have a dog in that fight. I will say that I enjoyed the trip and I always love Baja any time I get a chance to visit. And I do like your product. Salute!
 
Douglas, Enrique and Manuel are the trifecta that manages the only sea pearl farm on this continent, indeed, in the New World. As well as being pearl farmers, these guys are well educated, trained scientists, with bigger dreams than they have yet accomplished. No, not dreams of expanding until they are huge and rich; there is little room for that in their philosophy. They are not in it for the money though at least one wishes the farm income were enough to support him without taking extra jobs. They are in it for the pearl of the Rainbow-lipped pinctada, a pearl oyster unlike any other in the world. And by extension, they are in it for the shell the pearl came in, the bay the shell grew in, the sea the bay comes from. And so on.
.

Thank you for this travelogue, the pictures and the intrigue!

... since 1994, when we began this as a very modest research program.

Douglas, you and your collegues are an inspiration. Not only for breaking the glass ceiling in North American pearl culture, but also for the tenacity to bring your work into production. Apart from that, I absolutely love how you've instilled and maintained a very "Mexican" flair to your products. Such beauty and rarity.

Little did I realize, I was likely the first person in the Americas to receive a pearl farm license, despite the absence of a production plan. One other person, Dr. Peter Fankboner followed my application with an abalone project, but also lacked viability. He has long since retired.

Perhaps one day, I may be so fortunate as Jeremy, Blaire and Caitlin were, to visit your farm.
 
Hey Douglas!
I am sure you all do everything perfectly given your time and circumstances and the most efficient way! In fact, I know you do. It is one of the things that is so outstanding about the Sea of Cortez operation. I am leaving it to the pros to describe your operation and get technical details correct

My whole post was fantasy-driven that I would stand up and pitch tourists in the first place?? !! Those mabe in the silver rings kind of remind me of the little spat, wiggling around on the nets. Little life forms in boxes clamoring to get adopted.....

I can't believe a poetic place like Guaymas hasn't had more poetry written about it! Technically, that was 4 verses of haiku, including the one starting with "Bacochibampo" in the next post. I need to fix one of the first three so it fits the haiku format better.

My gift to you. Enjoy!
 
Last edited:
There is at least one other seller with Cortez pearls..(only three, but then there isn't much of a market for them)
 
Douglas, you live in paradise!

Talk about translating, I got one of these for school about a year ago, but I've found it invaluable for other things in daily life as well. It has a translator. Just write the word in English, tap on the word, and it will say the word in whatever language you choose. It even translates to Mandarin if you wish. Technology, what a marvel.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekjw1ewyAUU&NR=1
 
Hey Roomy!
Things sure were mellow, weren't they?

Guaymas has perfect weather this time of year and in the fall. During the summer, it is near 120 f, at worst and 99% humidity. No winds in the summer. Winter is cold and the wind makes it seem worse. Those Guaymas-ers are a tough breed!

But if you can get used to it, and not many can, it is a great place to live. It is not tourist-y and probably won't be.
 
No argument here. You would know more then I would about it. I was offering to help at the time and had some friends from Japan and Australia who had some interest in seeding etc. But for some reason things just seemed to be sticky in La Paz. I honestly don't remember all the details. It was a few years ago now.
Sounds like there is some history there with you and them. I don't have a dog in that fight. I will say that I enjoyed the trip and I always love Baja any time I get a chance to visit. And I do like your product. Salute!

We get along just fine these days...we did have some frictions in the past, but it is now all in the past. We have the future to keep an eye on, don't we all?
A question: your Jap/Aussie friends were seeding techs??? Did they ever have a chance to seed any MOPs in La Paz??? If you have the time...please do tell! I am registering EVERYTHING about Pearl Culture in Mexico and would really hate to miss something.
Thanks for the information! It has already proven valuable... :)
 
Guaymas has perfect weather this time of year and in the fall. During the summer, it is near 120 f, at worst and 99% humidity. No winds in the summer. Winter is cold and the wind makes it seem worse. Those Guaymas-ers are a tough breed!

But if you can get used to it, and not many can, it is a great place to live. It is not tourist-y and probably won't be.

You are quite right about that! But many of our visitors are Canadians and Americans (from the northern-most States) that migrate when the snow starts falling up north, they enjoy our "mild winters" (for them, at least) and then migrate north for summer. For thousands of these people, Guaymas-San Carlos is their second-home. :D
 
We get along just fine these days...we did have some frictions in the past, but it is now all in the past. We have the future to keep an eye on, don't we all?
A question: your Jap/Aussie friends were seeding techs??? Did they ever have a chance to seed any MOPs in La Paz??? If you have the time...please do tell! I am registering EVERYTHING about Pearl Culture in Mexico and would really hate to miss something.
Thanks for the information! It has already proven valuable... :)
I will send you some pics and information
 
Sounds like you all had a great time in Guaymas ... still get lobster and marghueritas down there??
Douglas, your pearls are beautiful, and it is fabulous to listen to an interesting narrative from your guests. One day, one day....
 
Lovely to see some more of your pearls, Douglas. I love those colors. Sounds like you all had a good time.
 
still get lobster and marghueritas down there??
....

Yes to the drinks, and it seems we had every seafood, but lobster! We had ocotpus two different ways and some kind of delicious cocktail that had many many things in it. The night before I left, I went for lobster with my friend Jo Ellen and I remember thinking it was silly to stuff myself with lobster before going to Guaymas. Then we got there and I don't remember lobster even being mentioned.

The really funny thing was me convincing Jeremy we should try the tuna pate', as everything we had at that restaurant was sensational. It was ordinary tuna from a can mixed with mayo. What a disappointment, but a good laugh! :eek:
 
Yes, tuna p?t? was a bit of a disappointment:p Straight from the can! Everything else there was amazing, though.

That cocktail that had everything (raw) in it was called maleficio.
 
Back
Top