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Silly question: can creamy WSS be bleached to white WSS?

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  • CortezPearls
    replied
    There are...but we ran out of money to pay for the insurance (it was not my decision to do it this way) and the idea was to start selling jewelry and obtain the money to pay for insurance. The store had opened just 2 months before.
    And then there were many difficulties about this insurance...in Mexico this is costlier, and you are always less protected due to our "peculiarities".

    But...you live, you learn...

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  • Charlotta
    replied
    Usually there are a force majeure clause of insurances. Those insurance companies are slippery.

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  • StarryPearl
    replied
    CortezPearls Does any insurance company provide insurance for this kind of damage? Like when we buy a house, there are insurance plans for flood, theft, etc.. Natural disasters seem more and more severe and frequently. The effect of climate change is more and more obvious.

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  • CortezPearls
    replied
    It was heartbreaking at the moment and for years to follow (you keep paying your debts, even if you no longer have the assets) but it is just part of the past BWeaves
    Probably one of the reasons I also enjoyed reading Sholem Aleichem's (Rabinowitz) stories...they are in the past, no longer present.

    Yes lisa c and I guess Josh Humbert could tell us more details about their use of their buildings...just being on top of strong wood beams makes it better to survive a flood or even a small tsunami. But we never had a chance with a "God-Level" Hurricane. It wrecked every single place it touched...went up all the way to Nova Scotia in Canada, can you believe that?!?!?!?

    Hurricane Wilma was the most intense tropical cyclone ever recorded in the Atlantic basin, and the second-most intense tropical cyclone recorded in the Western Hemisphere, after Hurricane Patricia in 2015.
    From Wikipedia

    I don't know if these round-shaped, elevated, structures could have survived this hurricane. I was fortunate I left just 2 days before it touched Cozumel.

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  • lisa c
    replied
    I’ve wondered if building in the round hut-shaped way would help buildings survive tropical storms better? On the other hand, I suppose we’re looking at water/surge damage, not just winds, right? The roiling water tears the shells away from moorings, and cages are separated from anchors.

    Anyway, I looked it up once, and the articles were interesting. Made me appreciate architecture and the use of porches and bay windows as wind manipulators. It’s genius, I tell ya!

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  • BWeaves
    replied
    Wow, Douglas, that is heartbreaking.

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  • CortezPearls
    replied
    LOL...not the "brave"...just the ones that have learned to laugh at the person in the mirror. Living in Mexico may be a part of it...you know, the whole thing about "Day of the Dead" but also a bit of reading does that...I used to read one Sholem Aleichem...even when my Opa told me not to read him.
    Dark humor

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  • StarryPearl
    replied
    @CortezPearls, thanks for sharing the info and story and pictures.

    Good point fishermen don't have X-ray machine. I thought of this but then I thought if people use X-ray to check bead retaining, they can certainly check pearls, totally forgetting those are "farmers" who culture pearls, not fishermen...

    I am so sorry your beautiful store ended(?) up like that... the pain of dreams shattered... I can't imagine... I have been maniac on pearls recently and dreaming of owning a teeny-tiny farm in unforeseeable future - I resist considering this situation, too painful. With that said, your "even the safe was taken by the sea" made me burst into laughter. Only the brave talks pain into humor.

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  • CortezPearls
    replied
    BTW...this are two photos, the Before & After of our pearl farm in Cozumel. 2005 it was...Hurricane "Wilma".
    Cozumel pearl farm storefront before hurricane


    So, we had just finished setting up this beautiful store, we had the pearl farm equipment and we were ready to start...then came the hurricane and this is all that was left behind.
    Yikes!


    Total loss. Dreams shattered. Money down the...Caribbean, even the safe was taken by the sea...there is treasure out there!

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  • CortezPearls
    replied
    LOL StarryPearl I can imagine your husband's sad eyes now!

    Yes, I actually lived for 6 months in the island of Cozumel back in 2004. We were to open a pearl farm there and we opened two stores also...everything was destroyed by a hurricane in 2006. Anyway, I was still omnivorous, and I had the chance to enjoy the conch shell meat...it was SUPERB! That animal is not simply food...it is a DELICACY. The shells are also sold...I mean, they try not to waste any dollar.

    Fishermen don't have access to x-ray machines...and if they did, they would have to scan thousands of animals in an hour and in the heat, under the sun...so the animals would probably die and they would spoil. The x-ray machine requires a clean and non-salty environment too. And then again: the fishermen are after meat, not the pearl...the pearl is like winning the lotto while having a taco. You came for the tacos on "Taco Tuesday" but you left with a prize

    Last edited by CortezPearls; 03-30-2021, 02:27 PM. Reason: typos

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  • StarryPearl
    replied
    Thank you for bringing that up, @Pearl Dreams, and thanks for clarifying, @CortezPearls.I was thinking if people were to hunt for the pearls, why don't they just X-ray the shells, that will save so much time and labor. So I thought maybe they were primarily after the beautiful pink conch shells. But for meat? Are they really THAT hungry ? (btw, Douglas, not that I am coveting queen conch's meat, but did you ever taste it? Is it THAT good to be threatened by overfishing? )

    And a somewhat unrelated update: I have convinced my husband that we will not buy scallops any more after finishing the last 2lb bag in our freezer, all thanks (and sorry) to those shining blue eyes ...

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  • StarryPearl
    replied
    Originally posted by pattye View Post
    How amazing that we can have these deep discussions here and learn from Douglas's and everyone's experiences; a winding path from what someone thought was a "silly question!"
    Exactly, Pattye! I have a ton of questions and I feel so lucky and grateful to have found a place where people know the answers and share generously. Hope one day I can help with others' questions, too.

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  • Pearl Dreams
    replied
    I've read that conchs are vegetarians. Gentle creatures...TBH I hate that they are hunted for their pearls, much as I admire conch pearls.
    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________
    The following is what CortezPearls wrote in reply. I think he was trying to quote me and write his own post, but ended up editing my post by mistake. (I re-edited for clarity).

    The thing is that animals are fished for their meat, not for the pearls. At least NOW.
    So, the pearls are a by-product that we would never be able to enjoy were it not for seafood lovers. I don't feel guilty by owning or buying natural pearls...but I don't eat seafood! (BTW, this month will have a new documentary called "Seaspiracy" in Netflix, about the fishing industry).

    If the fisheries stopped (I would applaud it!) and we never had other pearls than cultured pearls or sustainably produced natural pearls (subject to discussion and it would be fascinating) I would be happy.
    Last edited by Pearl Dreams; 03-27-2021, 04:42 PM.

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  • CortezPearls
    replied
    I am very happy to SHARE
    And this is what this forum is about...sharing our finds, interests, knowledge, experience and above all: OUR LOVE FOR PEARLS

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  • StarryPearl
    replied
    Originally posted by CortezPearls View Post

    Sure thing StarryPearl and Yes: the Argopecten (and also that of genus Pecten) abductor muscle is what is usually refered to as the "scallop" for God know what reason. The one you are most used to is Argopecten irradians from the Atlantic coast of the United States.
    Click image for larger version

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    On this photo its primitive "eyes" (ocelli) look like pearls...don't they?

    Why did we attempt to use them to grow pearls...because we could. We had the animals, we had time on our hands and with every experiment I learned more and more...I attuned myself as an instrument to deeply understand the animals. And I did leanr many things, one is that you should NEVER try to produce pearls inside the abductor muscle, and never in the scallop's gonads. I actually believed that because the gonad of a scallop are "conspicuous" (separate from the rest of the body and very evident) I could produce pearls there with almost no rejection and almost zero mortality rates. I know that if I had tried for longer I could have made progress there...but I had to focus on the species that was producing pearls: the Rainbow Lip!

    And even if the pearls are non-nacreous (in those days we just called them "calcium concretions") they had their own personality...specially the pearls of the Lion's Paw scallop (Nodipecten subnudosus). I have some pearls and they are quite unique! This one is bi-colored.
    Click image for larger version

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    They have this unique "pattern" that is mesmerizing in its own way.

    The mantle selection criteria was very very simple at that moment...if it has mantle: let's use it!
    It mattered little if the shell was white or purple...the only real criterion was: it has to be a healthy donor and the shell must be "clean" without spots or defects.

    So, for me at least at that time in my life it was all about LEARNING all I could from these primitive and amazing mollusks so I could eventually perform the best job possible in the most humane way.
    How beautiful and naturally delicate this Argopecten is! The eyes do look like pearls, to me like tiny blue akoyas under strong LED flashlight. Have to say this picture makes me consider removing "scallops" from my menu.

    Thank you very much for your replies and sharing, Douglas. I almost feel like I am abusing your kindness.

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