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  • #16
    Yup. This is the real thing! It is a life memory. Click image for larger version

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    Author:Pearls A Practical Guide published by Crowood Jan 2021
    www.pearlsapractical.guide

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    • #17
      This is also the REAL DEAL:
      Douglas McLaurin-Moreno
      Admin to Pearl-Guide.com
      Pearl Farming Specialist
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      Your Life evolves in the same way a Pearl grows: with continuous layers of experiences/nacre that add to the Story of your Life on Earth and make you Unique and Beautiful.
      Douglas McLaurin-Moreno

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      • #18
        Were you re-grafting those, Douglas?
        Author:Pearls A Practical Guide published by Crowood Jan 2021
        www.pearlsapractical.guide

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        • #19
          This thread is getting more and more interesting. Thanks very much for sharing such wonderful experiences, Wendy and Douglas, the photo and video are amazing! (And I kind of feel the oysters' pain when watching them cut, despite that I know they only have a ganglion and don't feel pain.)

          After re-grafting, do you leave the oysters' cut just like that, only put it in certain environment for it to recover better, or do you suture the cut?

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          • #20
            Interesting questions StarryPearl. I love questions!
            And this very morning I was watching a video with Jeremy Shepherd and Rui Gallopim about freshwater pearls and the "new FWP from China" (I actually added the video to the "News Section") and Rui asks Jeremy this same question about the "pain" and "irritation" that comes from the oysters when making pearls...or harvesting them and Jeremy and I are in PERFECT UNISON when it comes to this subject:

            These mollusks DO NOT EXPERIENCE PAIN. Maybe some conchs and certainly the cephalopods could experience "pain", but pain is an actual CONSTRUCT of a brain...and if you don't have one: you can't feel it. These mollusks -for Jeremy and I- are animals that are almost "plant-like"...and plants and ALL life-forms experience something called "irritation" and they react to it. The "irritant" is anything that causes bodily harm. The creature's tissues and cells will react by secreting mucus and will try to "retreat" from damage. But because they do not have a brain...the response can actually just be limited to a small part of the body and the rest of the body is totally OBLIVIOUS to what might be happening on -let's say- the foot or mantle.

            Now think about us... Humans. We can FEEL pain even if we are not being actively hurt! A bad memory can trigger it, seeing a person that has mistreated us, remembering a personal loss...there are so many things that will do it for us

            So, from our perspective: oysters are "plantanimals" and we should be kind to them, never, ever mistreat them...but we should not concern ourselves too much with that feeling that we are hurting them, just like when you have a salad or an apple or banana. Enjoy and be Thankful for the fruits of Life.

            In the case of re-seeding...this video is about harvesting Cortez Pearl using the "Rainbow Lip" oyster, so you can only use the oyster once (just like with Akoya oysters) since they are a short-lived species. The thing with the video is that I wanted to show you how the pearl comes out in an almost "poetic" fashion? The way pearls are extracted is totally messy and far from poetic: like squishing an egg.
            So, once the video was shot...the oysters were all extracted from their shells, meat separated for sale and that was it. Not very poetic
            Last edited by CortezPearls; 03-16-2021, 11:51 PM. Reason: typo
            Douglas McLaurin-Moreno
            Admin to Pearl-Guide.com
            Pearl Farming Specialist
            Follow Me!
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            Your Life evolves in the same way a Pearl grows: with continuous layers of experiences/nacre that add to the Story of your Life on Earth and make you Unique and Beautiful.
            Douglas McLaurin-Moreno

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            • #21
              BTW: I don't EAT any animals. I went 100% Plant-Based eater 5 years ago. I cannot be considered "Vegan" because I work with animals. I have great simpathy for animals and all-life, for our Planet... I could not perform an operation on oysters or have a pearl farm if I did not believe it was something GOOD.
              Douglas McLaurin-Moreno
              Admin to Pearl-Guide.com
              Pearl Farming Specialist
              Follow Me!
              Instagram
              YouTube


              Your Life evolves in the same way a Pearl grows: with continuous layers of experiences/nacre that add to the Story of your Life on Earth and make you Unique and Beautiful.
              Douglas McLaurin-Moreno

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by CortezPearls View Post
                Interesting questions StarryPearl. I love questions!
                And this very morning I was watching a video with Jeremy Shepherd and Rui Gallopim about freshwater pearls and the "new FWP from China" (I actually added the video to the "News Section") and Rui asks Jeremy this same question about the "pain" and "irritation" that comes from the oysters when making pearls...or harvesting them and Jeremy and I are in PERFECT UNISON when it comes to this subject:

                These mollusks DO NOT EXPERIENCE PAIN. Maybe some conchs and certainly the cephalopods could experience "pain", but pain is an actual CONSTRUCT of a brain...and if you don't have one: you can't feel it. These mollusks -for Jeremy and I- are animals that are almost "plant-like"...and plants and ALL life-forms experience something called "irritation" and they react to it. The "irritant" is anything that causes bodily harm. The creature's tissues and cells will react by secreting mucus and will try to "retreat" from damage. But because they do not have a brain...the response can actually just be limited to a small part of the body and the rest of the body is totally OBLIVIOUS to what might be happening on -let's say- the foot or mantle.

                Now think about us... Humans. We can FEEL pain even if we are not being actively hurt! A bad memory can trigger it, seeing a person that has mistreated us, remembering a personal loss...there are so many things that will do it for us

                So, from our perspective: oysters are "plantanimals" and we should be kind to them, never, ever mistreat them...but we should not concern ourselves too much with that feeling that we are hurting them, just like when you have a salad or an apple or banana. Enjoy and be Thankful for the fruits of Life.

                In the case of re-seeding...this video is about harvesting Cortez Pearl using the "Rainbow Lip" oyster, so you can only use the oyster once (just like with Akoya oysters) since they are a short-lived species. The thing with the video is that I wanted to show you how the pearl comes out in an almost "poetic" fashion? The way pearls are extracted is totally messy and far from poetic: like squishing an egg.
                So, once the video was shot...the oysters were all extracted from their shells, meat separated for sale and that was it. Not very poetic
                Dear Douglas, thank you so much for treating my reply so seriously. It is interesting to learn that conchs may be able to experience pain. Like I said, I knew there was no pain for the oysters. (I have degrees in biology and I understand they are not developed enough to have this sensation, much less to "feel" the pain.)

                What a pity the most beautiful rainbow lip oysters do not live long enough to carry more than one pearls. So how is this done with SSP and T? After regrafting, were they just laid there in certain places to recover or what? How can the technicians be sure the pearl sac will enclose perfectly or well enough later so that they do not get a "fireball" or tail shaped pearl? Besides, did you taste the meat? Does it taste like oyster or scallop? Do people eat it raw or cooked? Anywhere we can buy the meat online? Has anyone ever tried using rainbow lip's mantle pieces as donor tissue in black lip's implantation? Will the epithelial cells die because they are from different genus? I don't know if same family is good enough for the epithelial cells to survive, but, if they can survive and grow into a pearl sac in T's oyster, produce larger number of "psudo-cortez pearl" and able to re-graft due to longer life of T's oyster, won't that be awesome? - Somebody wake me up!

                Thank you for sharing the video. I really enjoy it. It is already much more "poetic" than I thought. I thought people just wander their fingers inside and squish, but in the video I saw scalpel and tweezers, and the person who operated seems quite treasuring the pearls. I love seeing these.

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                • #23
                  Yes, and I would even say that we should all just trust ourselves a bit in how we feel about plants & animals. Years ago I was beach-combing after a hurricane. Usually thousands of animals are washed ashore
                  In a particular day a found a badly beaten conch shell and I picked it up...thought the snail was dead. I was inspecting the shell and out "pops" out this tiny face with stall-like blue eyes and looks straight into my Soul...and I just melted with empathy. Took it to the water and put it there so it could recover and hopefully live. I will never forget this moment of union...that animal had a Soul.

                  Now, to your questions! (and other members can surely share their knowledge):

                  1) So how is this done with SSP and T? After regrafting, were they just laid there in certain places to recover or what?
                  After re-seeding (this is the more accurate term since the pearl-sac is already in place and only a "seed" or nucleus is required) the oysters are placed back in their cages. Just like they had been before. This surgery is far less intrusive than the first one.

                  2) How can the technicians be sure the pearl sac will enclose perfectly or well enough later so that they do not get a "fireball" or tail shaped pearl? The beauty of it is that YOU NEVER KNOW...if Forrest Gump had ever been in contact with "Bubba the Pearler" (as opposed to his shrimp lovin' twin) he would have coined the phrase. "Life is like a pearl oyster...you never know which kind of pearl you gonna get...if at all!". So you trust in yourself and in Lady Luck!

                  3) Does it taste like oyster or scallop? Do people eat it raw or cooked? Anywhere we can buy the meat online? I did enjoy the meat! It is sweet & crunchy...just like scallops meat! Actually, pearl oysters should be referred to as "pearl scallops" since they are closely related to them! They are all Pteriomorpha! People in Mexico eat it cooked (baked, fried, charbroiled and deep-fried in batter) or raw (in ceviche or sashimi styled "aguachile").
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                  Looks tasty? It is! But...I'm not having any, anymore. Done with that.

                  These are raw...
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                  You have to get them at the fish market or supermarkets. Here we all know of fishermen so we can just call and ask for an order and they will collect them. Farmed oyster meat is only available at the farm during harvest time (June-July).

                  3) Has anyone ever tried using rainbow lip's mantle pieces as donor tissue in black lip's implantation? Yes, I did. We actually tried with several species of scallops too. Results were bad: no pearls formed.

                  4) Will the epithelial cells die because they are from different genus? seems that way! We never found pearls in the experiments we performed, using Pinctada, Pteria, Nodipecten, Pinna and Argopecten. Inter-species grafting seems useless

                  5) but in the video I saw scalpel and tweezers, and the person who operated seems quite treasuring the pearls. That was all me...me on camera, my hands and my respect and admiration for these beautiful creatures.
                  Douglas McLaurin-Moreno
                  Admin to Pearl-Guide.com
                  Pearl Farming Specialist
                  Follow Me!
                  Instagram
                  YouTube


                  Your Life evolves in the same way a Pearl grows: with continuous layers of experiences/nacre that add to the Story of your Life on Earth and make you Unique and Beautiful.
                  Douglas McLaurin-Moreno

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                  • #24
                    Hi Douglas, it brightens my Saturday morning and massages my soul to read your reply. I can imagine the touching scene, you and the conch snail...

                    I love your "Life is a pearl..." phrase. I somewhat likes it better than the original one with chocolate, because oftentimes you do "plant a seed", and the process of caring and waiting... Guess I'm talking about "Life is a beaded pearl", haha.

                    If I may ask one more question - I googled and saw Nodipecten, Pinna and Argopect are scallops (btw, is Argopecten's adductor musclewhat we usually eat?) that rarely produce pearls and even when they do, their pearls are non-nacreous. When we do grafting, we select donors from oysters that have the most beautiful mother-of-pearl, expecting their epithelial cells to build the highest quality pearls. These three species do not even have mother-of-pearl or secrete nacre, why did you try them and what was the criteria to choose the donors?

                    Thanks a lot for answering my questions. I learned a lot that I won't have a chance to know elsewhere. ​​

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                    • #25
                      I love your conch story, Douglas.
                      Who could resist those gentle eyes?


                      Click image for larger version

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                      • #26
                        Yep, it does have a soul. I can se that. Once I was suppose to kill a mouse, that weren't suppose to be indoors. It stopped at my feet and looked at me. I let it run of course. I cannot kill anything.

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                        • #27
                          Those eyes !!
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                          • #28
                            If I may ask one more question - I googled and saw Nodipecten, Pinna and Argopect are scallops (btw, is Argopecten's adductor musclewhat we usually eat?) that rarely produce pearls and even when they do, their pearls are non-nacreous. When we do grafting, we select donors from oysters that have the most beautiful mother-of-pearl, expecting their epithelial cells to build the highest quality pearls. These three species do not even have mother-of-pearl or secrete nacre, why did you try them and what was the criteria to choose the donors?f I may ask one more question - I googled and saw Nodipecten, Pinna and Argopect are scallops (btw, is Argopecten's adductor musclewhat we usually eat?) that rarely produce pearls and even when they do, their pearls are non-nacreous. When we do grafting, we select donors from oysters that have the most beautiful mother-of-pearl, expecting their epithelial cells to build the highest quality pearls. These three species do not even have mother-of-pearl or secrete nacre, why did you try them and what was the criteria to choose the donors?
                            Sure thing StarryPearl and Yes: the Argopecten (and also that of genus Pecten) abductor muscle is what is usually refered to as the "scallop" for God know what reason. The one you are most used to is Argopecten irradians from the Atlantic coast of the United States.
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                            On this photo its primitive "eyes" (ocelli) look like pearls...don't they?

                            Why did we attempt to use them to grow pearls...because we could. We had the animals, we had time on our hands and with every experiment I learned more and more...I attuned myself as an instrument to deeply understand the animals. And I did leanr many things, one is that you should NEVER try to produce pearls inside the abductor muscle, and never in the scallop's gonads. I actually believed that because the gonad of a scallop are "conspicuous" (separate from the rest of the body and very evident) I could produce pearls there with almost no rejection and almost zero mortality rates. I know that if I had tried for longer I could have made progress there...but I had to focus on the species that was producing pearls: the Rainbow Lip!

                            And even if the pearls are non-nacreous (in those days we just called them "calcium concretions") they had their own personality...specially the pearls of the Lion's Paw scallop (Nodipecten subnudosus). I have some pearls and they are quite unique! This one is bi-colored.
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                            They have this unique "pattern" that is mesmerizing in its own way.

                            The mantle selection criteria was very very simple at that moment...if it has mantle: let's use it!
                            It mattered little if the shell was white or purple...the only real criterion was: it has to be a healthy donor and the shell must be "clean" without spots or defects.

                            So, for me at least at that time in my life it was all about LEARNING all I could from these primitive and amazing mollusks so I could eventually perform the best job possible in the most humane way.
                            Douglas McLaurin-Moreno
                            Admin to Pearl-Guide.com
                            Pearl Farming Specialist
                            Follow Me!
                            Instagram
                            YouTube


                            Your Life evolves in the same way a Pearl grows: with continuous layers of experiences/nacre that add to the Story of your Life on Earth and make you Unique and Beautiful.
                            Douglas McLaurin-Moreno

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                            • #29
                              And yes Charlotta
                              and Katbran ...those eyes...

                              I actually have the photo I took before I placed the conch back in the water...
                              ​​​​​​​
                              Douglas McLaurin-Moreno
                              Admin to Pearl-Guide.com
                              Pearl Farming Specialist
                              Follow Me!
                              Instagram
                              YouTube


                              Your Life evolves in the same way a Pearl grows: with continuous layers of experiences/nacre that add to the Story of your Life on Earth and make you Unique and Beautiful.
                              Douglas McLaurin-Moreno

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Fascinating.

                                The eyes in the conch are killing me.
                                Last edited by BWeaves; 03-22-2021, 10:22 PM.

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