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Name the Pearl!

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  • jshepherd
    replied
    One name was selected by the CPAA that had a really good backstory to it. I delivered it to the president of the HKPA while in Hong Kong and he didn't seem to like it. He said he would bring the name and argument to the association to get their thoughts, but that is the last I've heard about it from their side.

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  • ennui
    replied
    I thought the winner was supposed to be announced March 12 ... has anyone heard anything? I didn't see anything on the CPAA site.

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  • lisa c
    replied
    (Oops! Musings intercepted...must terminate.)

    Why, yes, Jacques, we do really get into it! Sometimes. Often. Want to play?
    Last edited by lisa c; 02-17-2015, 04:26 AM.

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  • cmd2014
    replied
    Originally posted by jshepherd View Post
    The regularly produced ones are already called cultured freshwater pearls. Cultured just means farmed, not that the pearl has a bead.
    That makes sense. I'm looking forward to the new name!

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  • Jacques
    replied
    wow you pearly people really get into it here at PG!
    Jeremy thanks for the great article from 2011.

    I submitted. Let's see!

    It would be fun if they actually picked a name from someone here!

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  • lisa c
    replied
    Is this political, with the Chinese viewing "Ming" as an issue of Chinese dynastic respect/disrespect/disaffection? They might see us as non-Chinese boobs for not getting / understanding that, if such is the case. China, a huge conglomerate nation...only recently having revolutions, throwing off royalty, opening borders, historically protectivist, Purges...just musing.

    Ming seems obvious and familiar and politically neutral to us, maybe not so self-evident or safely logical to the Chinese?

    Is there a name percolating under all this already, on the Chinese-research-production side?

    {I'm definitely not meaning to call any of us here Politically insensitive boobs, or to imply that I'd know a politically insensitive boob if I saw one, or that I should call attention to one if I recognized one, or was being one myself}
    Last edited by lisa c; 02-16-2015, 11:22 PM.

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  • JerseyPearl
    replied
    Originally posted by jshepherd View Post
    Have you ever come across ripples being referred to as "ripples" in Hong Kong or anywhere off the Internet? I haven't. The term ripple was invented on the internet by CC of Australia I believe, and still lives on the internet as far as I know.

    Honora is probably the biggest seller of what we would call ripples or commercial grade beaded rounds in the United States and they call them all Mings, the name Tian Di Run uses for all of their beaded production.
    The strand I posted is from Honora, and they were identified as "Mings" and not ripples....po-tA-to/po-tAH-to...still just as pretty as can be!

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  • pinkjewel
    replied
    Well, I went ahead and sent in a suggestion. I would LOVE to win a trip to J. Hunter's farm being the huge J. Hunter fan that I am. Although, it wouldn't make the trip a sure thing by any means- it would at least get me a decent chance at going!!

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  • GemGeek
    replied
    Wasn't Ming originally a trade name, like "Spice Pearls" or Edisons?

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  • SunSeeker
    replied
    Kevin, thanks for the clarification!

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  • Kevin Canning
    replied
    Originally posted by jshepherd View Post

    One of my closest friends in Hong Kong is also the president of the Hong Kong Pearl Association. He told me that during his tenure the biggest thing he wanted to accomplish is finding a name for beaded freshwaters made sense, was easy to understand and not owned by a company.
    I believe I was there for one of the conversations about this, but my question would be is Micheal going to promote a name that the CPAA comes up with or vice versa? Given the cultural and language barriers I'm not sure both sides are going to agree on a name.

    What is their objection to calling them "Mings"?

    Originally posted by jshepherd View Post
    Have you ever come across ripples being referred to as "ripples" in Hong Kong or anywhere off the Internet? I haven't. The term ripple was invented on the internet by CC of Australia I believe, and still lives on the internet as far as I know.
    This is true, CC does deserve credit for coining the name. When I first brought ripples back in 2013 I called them "Kasumi-like freshwater pearls" because nobody was using the name "ripples" but CC and I didn't want to piggy back on her marketing. I later adopted the term when it was clear that the ladies in the forums were already set on calling them ripples and calling them anything else would just be creating confusion.

    The name doesn't extend past a couple of online sellers and the various pearl related forums like pricescope, the facet lounge and PG. If you asked for ripple pearls at any jewelry store or trade show booth all you'd get it blank stares.


    Originally posted by SunSeeker View Post
    Just curious, are Chinese Kasumiga-like pearls also the same as Edisons, Ripples, and Mings? ..same cultured process in the same mollusk?
    As I mentioned above this is partly my fault as I promoted the name "Kasumi-like" pearls in 2013, although there may have been other sellers doing so as well.

    Kasumiga-like = Ripples, same thing.

    Edison pearls = round bead nucleated FW pearls produced by Grace Pearl co.

    Mings = Generic Bead nucleated FW pearls

    Leave a comment:


  • SunSeeker
    replied
    Just curious, are Chinese Kasumiga-like pearls also the same as Edisons, Ripples, and Mings? ..same cultured process in the same mollusk?

    Leave a comment:


  • SunSeeker
    replied
    I agree with Kevin and Pattey for all the reasons already stated; they should adopt the name Ming and drop Edison.

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  • Katbran
    replied
    Very interesting ! I knew the basics but it was great to read the article that you provided Jeremy. Thanks for that. I too think that they should just keep it Ming. Easy name to remember, people are already familiar with it and it's Chinese.

    As to the name ripple ... I used to see the Chinese sellers on Ebay call them "Furrow" pearls. I thought that was quite an interesting word to use and that it had probably come up in 'google translate' from a chinese adjective for the surface texture. lol

    Leave a comment:


  • jshepherd
    replied
    Originally posted by pattye View Post

    From what I saw of Honora's offerings on QVC, they are already doing just that, with plenty of rippled pearls being called Ming. Yes, there will be a learning curve, but oh well, there always is.
    The original Ming pearls were ripples: http://www.ssef.ch/uploads/media/201...from_China.pdf

    Ming came before Edison, not after. Grace was the company that succeeded in getting rid of the ripple effect on the surface of the pearls and then started calling them Edison Pearls.

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