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Mississippi River Pearls

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  • kojimapearl
    replied
    Fun to see more American natural pearls popping up. It is a sweet collection, I love those angel wings!
    Great drawings Dave!

    Leave a comment:


  • lisa c
    replied
    Hi Lagoon Dave, your post took a while to digest (blame Thanksgiving) but geez! You're the best for breaking it down to digestible bits, the best! Thank you!
    Last edited by lisa c; 12-02-2014, 05:23 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • rivermandave
    replied
    Originally posted by Caitlin View Post
    Hi rivermandave
    Thanks for posting! Your photos and info are very welcome here where they permanently add so much to our pearl educations!

    You are allowed to put your ebay store's url in your signature so we can click thru. It would be under "my profile" at the top of the page. Natural American freshwater pearls are a prize in anyone's collection, so thankyou for being a source of these treasures.
    Thanks Caitlin.

    I don't have a "store" but I've added a link to my items for sale.

    Leave a comment:


  • CathyKeshi
    replied
    Thanks Lisa C. Dave, love a good science drawing and explanation ... many thanks ... I've always wondered about those wing pearls!

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  • lisa c
    replied
    Thank you for the story Cathy. Bless their dear little hearts, they wanted to make a necklace for their Mom.
    Last edited by lisa c; 11-30-2014, 12:07 AM.

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  • Lagoon Island Pearls
    replied
    "Different locations in the shell form the variety of shapes. Those along the lip are round and the largest ones are the rarest. Wing shaped pearls form along the back of the shell, and irregular or "baroque" pearls form in the heel of the shell. The brighter the luster, the more valuable it makes the pearl."

    No and yes.

    Pearls near the edge of the shell are smaller. That's because it's newer growth and lesser space. It's true that pearls form along the dorsal ridge within the pallial cavity, but shapes are varied.

    I have attached a drawing of three orders of mollusk. Albeit crude and not necessarily to scale.

    Click image for larger version

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    1- Clam (Heterodonta)
    2- Mussel (Pteriomorph)
    2- Pearl Oyster (Pterioid)

    a - Pallial line
    b- Adductor muscle
    c- Pallial sinus

    In every bivalve mollusk, the mantle has a point of attachment to the shell. This by the edges of the adductor muscle, then following the pallial line enclosing a circular pattern.

    Clams have equal sized adductors, both anterior and posterior. In mussels, the anterior muscle is reduced in size, while the posterior adductor is exaggerated. Pearl oysters have a singular, large adductor.

    This is an excellent example of evolution, as pearl oysters more advanced than clams. In that evolution, the pallial line is reduced. In the pearl oyster, the pallial line is less than half the diameter of the shell, while in the clam it's greater than half. In mussels, that process is incomplete, where the pallial line is greater in some areas, lesser in others. The term "pteriomorphia", means mussels are changing to become closer to their pearl oyster "pterioda" cousins. This creates appendix-like pockets where pearls conform to the surrounding tissues and spaces.

    I have outlined in red, the area adjacent to the pallial sinus, where varied angles mark the pallial line. In saltwater mussels, this transition is more advanced than freshwater, hence the sharp angles and appendix pockets are reduced.

    Therefore, it's reasonable to suggest "wing" pearls are common in freshwater mussels, uncommon in saltwater mussels and rare in pearl oysters.

    Leave a comment:


  • CathyKeshi
    replied
    My father often talked of the small jar of little pearls he and his 3 brothers were collecting from "clams" to make a necklace for their mother. This would have been in the 1930's - early 1940's, in the tiny streams in northeastern Pennsylvania; Dad said at that time, the streams were full of little "clams" ... not so now. Dad's mother died when he was only 4, and the pearls were lost somewhere in the shuffle of his father raising 4 sons on his own. Dad never forgot those little pearls.

    Leave a comment:


  • Caitlin
    replied
    Hi rivermandave
    Thanks for posting! Your photos and info are very welcome here where they permanently add so much to our pearl educations!

    You are allowed to put your ebay store's url in your signature so we can click thru. It would be under "my profile" at the top of the page. Natural American freshwater pearls are a prize in anyone's collection, so thankyou for being a source of these treasures.

    Leave a comment:


  • rivermandave
    replied
    @ all...you're welcome!

    Originally posted by pattye View Post
    Such interesting pearls and stories! Thanks very much! Do you know in what part of the mussel the long slender ones, wing pearls, are formed? I'll have to see if Strack has any info in her book about that. They seem so specific to that variety.
    Hi pattye...there is basically no info that I have seen on the 'Net....but I did run across this...

    "Different locations in the shell form the variety of shapes. Those along the lip are round and the largest ones are the rarest. Wing shaped pearls form along the back of the shell, and irregular or "baroque" pearls form in the heel of the shell. The brighter the luster, the more valuable it makes the pearl."

    On this webpage...

    https://www.etsy.com/listing/2000239...rls?ref=market

    Leave a comment:


  • Katbran
    replied
    Really interesting, thanks for posting !

    Leave a comment:


  • CathyKeshi
    replied
    Wonderful to see these pearls; Thanks!

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  • GemGeek
    replied
    A nice treat to find on Saturday night!

    Leave a comment:


  • pattye
    replied
    Such interesting pearls and stories! Thanks very much! Do you know in what part of the mussel the long slender ones, wing pearls, are formed? I'll have to see if Strack has any info in her book about that. They seem so specific to that variety.

    Leave a comment:


  • lisa c
    replied
    (((RivermanDave))) Thank you for the plain background; just look at the subtleties!

    Yes, it's eBay! Thank you for that reminder. :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • rivermandave
    replied
    Originally posted by lisa c View Post
    Hi RivermanDave, Happy Thanksgiving!

    I bet you know what's coming - please could you re-photograph them individually, on a non-reflective white background? I'm having a lot of luck with my iPhone camera (hurray for monthly payment plans) in low light, with the auto-flash and HDR activated.

    (BTW, you used to post here a while ago, right? Am I mistaken? Or were you ever featured in an article about clamming, freshwater pearls and freshwater lakes? Your username just sounds so familiar :-)...)
    Same to you Lisa.

    I hope these pics will suffice.

    I had a couple of topics back in July about pearly stuff. I sell on Ebay with the same user name.

    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by rivermandave; 12-02-2014, 04:58 PM.

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