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Candled Natural Pearls

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  • Candled Natural Pearls

    I've been candling and photographing several natural pearls lately and selected a few that you might find interesting.

    It's an excellent alternative to the otherwise expensive process of X-ray from the labs.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Very, very cool!
    Pattye


    PatriciaSaabDesigns.etsy.com

    facebook.com/PatriciaSaabDesigns

    SO MANY PEARLS, SO LITTLE TIME----

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    • #3
      Absolutely cool, all right!

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      • #4
        what amazing pictures - all the pearls bar one, look like they could still be floating in the ocean - like those stange creatures you sometimes see photos of near the bottom - there's just something 'marine' about them

        thanks for posting them Dave
        Alex

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        • #5
          This is very hard to photograph. Hmmm... Gonna search for more suggestions to achieve such nice results.

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          • #6
            It's easy. I used a grey plastic jewelry box, about 1.5 inches square. I drilled a small hole in the bottom and a notch in the side. The hole can be any size smaller than the pearls to be examined. (I made a few of different sizes) Then I soldered an inexpensive LED to the wires of a used 12 volt adapter and place it under the inverted box, the notch allows it to lay flat over the wire.

            Then you can use the camera's macro setting or a low power USB microscope to photograph your pearls.

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            • #7
              Another turn-on. Like little universes unto themselves - endlessly fascinating.

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              • #8
                Hi Dave,

                Great info. Thanks for posting this.

                What type of lighting, camera, etc. do you use to candle these pearls?
                I tried to do this using a normal torch.. err... flashlight to you Americans. Would that suffice?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by katbadness View Post
                  What type of lighting, camera, etc. do you use to candle these pearls?
                  A 12 volt automotive (interior) LED worth about a dollar and a 5 megapixel USB telescope at 200x with the internal lighting turned off.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by katbadness View Post
                    I tried to do this using a normal torch.. err... flashlight to you Americans. Would that suffice?
                    I expanded on the idea from Steve (smetzler) who used a flashlight to candle his pearls. I like the LED box, because it sets nicely on a table or countertop, leaving hands free to set critical focus and run the computer.

                    And I'm Canadian

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                    • #11
                      Yes you are!

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                      • #12
                        Fascinating

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                        • #13
                          Re: Canadian... Oh right.. sorry... hahaha...

                          Re: setup for candling...
                          I picked up a few bluish SSP at the Indonesian Pearl Festival the other day (umm, I am still holding out on pics on you guys).. I was told by one vendor that the blue color is a result of "impurities" in the water that is filtered through by the oysters during the cultivation period. Not being a scientist, I don't even know if this explanation even makes sense. Could this be true?

                          Curious, I put a torch (flashlight.. heheheh) against all my blue-casted pearls and found that indeed they all have spots/marks throughout the nacre. One green keshi I picked up had the yellow colored nacre with this spots/marks throughout, which I assume is why the keshi is green colored.

                          I'm going to have to see if I can have a setup like yours and post pics.

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                          • #14
                            Wow! Amazing pictures! Thanks for showing us.

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                            • #15
                              Very cool pics and thanks for tips on how they were done.
                              For those challenged by wiring up an LED, a goose neck book light may be an alternative, something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Multi-Flex-Cli.../dp/B002XHOCVQ
                              kiwipaul
                              Auckland
                              New Zealand

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