Nautilus pearl

effisk

thou shall read the book
Joined
Oct 24, 2005
Messages
391
Hi all,

I have held in my hand a pearl from a nautilus last week end.

The pearl was egg shaped, about 8x6mm, white, it seemed translucent, porcelain-like. The surface was not smooth.

I did some research, and the only reference to a nautilus pearl I could find is an article in a French magazine La Nature in 1912. This article says that a photography of a nautilus pearl was given by a Mr. Lyster Jameson to Nature Magazine (14x11mm, 18 carat). I don't know if the photo has been published in that magazine.

Has anyone else heard of nautilus pearls ?
 
Hello,
Would you post a picture ?
I was thinking of a Nautilus shell /osmena, but I am sure you are talking about a real pearl, anxious to see it ...
 
yes I am talking about a proper pearl. I don't have any pictures, but will ask the owner if I can take some.
 
Hi Effisk

Please do see if you can get some pictures!

In theory, if other shelled creatures like conch and whelk can have pearls, why not Nautilus shell?

Osmina/osmena (I see it spelled both ways) "pearls" are usually shaped out of the middle of the shell material. It has a very special luster you can recognize as being from a nautilus shell.
 
Caitlin Williams said:
In theory, if other shelled creatures like conch and whelk can have pearls, why not Nautilus shell?

Wonder how that works - after all the animal a primitive cephalopodes not among the usual bivalve and gastropods pearl-makers. Anatomical similarities don't go that far.

Only heard of 'Nautilus Pearl' as a name for Osmena.

If this pearl is what it is said to be, that's quite a bit of news!

Well, just a thought. Is there a zoologist in the house? :)
 
Here is a peeled nautilus shell showing the osmina core
 

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Sorry for the wait :)

I'll try to get closeups. The skin of the pearl is really different, a bit like sanded glass.
 

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Wonderful photo!

O looked up nautilus pearls just now in Strack (I'm like a kid with a new toy with this fantastic book.) She has a section on osmena pearls, but for nautilus pearls she says (page 111) :

"Pearls from Nautilus pompilius are absolute rarities. Indeed, it cannot be even said with any certainty that they do exist. They are described as having a baroque or pear shape and a white colour without lustre. Some rare, pink samples have also been reported.... "
 
Did you notice any sort of chatoyancy or flame within the pearl while you were looking at it? The "porcelain" attribute used to describe the surface reminds me very much of the conch pearls- rather glassy, non-lustrous, non-iridescent.
 
Did you notice any sort of chatoyancy or flame within the pearl while you were looking at it? The "porcelain" attribute used to describe the surface reminds me very much of the conch pearls- rather glassy, non-lustrous, non-iridescent.
I'll really have to get a closeup as the surface is really hard to describe. It isn't smooth, I wouldn't say porcelain like. It's actually slightly bumpy, but with a regular pattern. No flames comparable to the conch pearls. It seems slightly transparent too. There is no iridescence as such but there is something that could compare to it.
 
Effisk,

This is exciting. I feel privileged to be able to one day see close-up photos of such a rare product of Nature!

Thank you for this thread!
CarolK
 
Fascinating. We've had references to osmena/osmina here, but not to pearls. 'Pearl Nautilus' converts to 'Nautilus Pearl' on Pearl-Guide!

Waiting for the close-ups, Effisk's photo offers enough detail to intrigue, with suggestions of both flame and opalescent qualities. Appears to be a kind of hybrid calcareous/nacreous creation. And I do perceive a hint of color (rose).

I'll send everyone running to the optometrist with this cropping.

Standing by?
 

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No kidding- the blown out pixels are a little tough on the eyes there! ;) I am tending to agree with you about the slight Rose shading- but maybe that is just an effect of the light? Or the camera? Hmmm

Effisk- thank you for your detailed observations... I must admit: I am very intrigued. Am definitely looking forward to a few close up shots
 
Nautilus pearls do exist

Nautilus pearls do exist

Hi all,

I have held in my hand a pearl from a nautilus last week end.

The pearl was egg shaped, about 8x6mm, white, it seemed translucent, porcelain-like. The surface was not smooth.

I did some research, and the only reference to a nautilus pearl I could find is an article in a French magazine La Nature in 1912. This article says that a photography of a nautilus pearl was given by a Mr. Lyster Jameson to Nature Magazine (14x11mm, 18 carat). I don't know if the photo has been published in that magazine.

Has anyone else heard of nautilus pearls ?


That is exciting! From what ocean did it come? Waiting for a good closeup.

Nautilus pompilius pearls definitely exist, but are perhaps the rarest of all pearls. As a cautionary note, there is a common object known near Australia as le coque de perle, which is carved from the central whirl where the shell is quite white.

Il faut obtenir certification de SSEF a Basel ou GIA. Je voudrais bien voir une photo tres claire.

Thanks,
Tom Stern,MD
Titan Natural Pearls
San Francisco, CA
 
........... there is a common object known near Australia as le coque de perle, which is carved from the central whirl where the shell is quite white....
I would like very much to see a pict. of a coq de perle ounce :confused:
 
Word to the wise

Word to the wise

I have seen a number of miscalls on Tridacna pearls coming from the swiss lab (ssef) and a few from Gubelin. On these certs the labs referred to the tridacna as Nautilus repertus. Conformation by (GIA)on any pearl being sold as nautilus is advised.

Best Regards.
Jeremy
 
Here is a peeled nautilus shell showing the osmina core

Very nice! Is it just my imagination or is the nautilus shell on page 111 of Strack peeled as well? Whether it is or not, it is so striking that a quick trip to Dresden to see it would be in order.
 
Any creature capable of producing shell is also capable of producing "pearls" (or calcium concretions). Cephalopods like the Nautilus are indeed rare (and rarer every year) so finding a pearl in one (let alone two!!!) is much better than finding a sunken ship loaded with treasure.

This is the ultimate freak of Nature...I would love to see those pearls...:cool:
 
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