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  • #31
    Originally posted by kojimapearl View Post
    Cyril , this is SO true : "The medical application isn't comparable with the branch that would use the nacrein and lipid extracts, and the predisposition of the patient (receptiveness to the cure) is as important as the components you may extract from the slow incineration process."
    Thank you.

    Originally posted by Caitlin View Post
    I think there probably are real elephant pearls and that one Strack photographed could be real, because she moves in the highest circles. If that one is the real one, none of the others look like that, but are usually smooth and egg like. I think these are substitute pearls and Strack may have the only known photo of a real one, because they would only belong to the most elite families and never get to the market. What does get on the market is the substitute stuff. In fact the market is almost 100% fantasy, except for the conch and mollusk pearls.
    I might be wrong, but shouldn't be "elephant pearls" dissociated from pearls composed of nacre?
    Dentine or hydroxylapatite does not qualify as "nacre".

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    • #32
      The Arabic tradition of Tibb (Unani Medicine) prepares pearls by the use of rose-water only. They are simply ground into a fine powder with freshly disttilled rosewater and ground for 20-30 hours - they sieved after fully drying. This method is called Pisti. Its actually quite soothing, I've tried it. Its also very cooling.
      Like most alchemical - based medicines there are many varied ways to prepare lots of minerals and metals, its not limited to animal products.

      The use of pearls is mentioned in the Purana's (India), so there use is pretty old. They still seem to prefer the use of marine pearls to freshwater though.
      I was wondering if its possible to get hold of some Abalone pearls to try them?
      I expect they are quite costly?
      The Chinese use Abalone shell as medicine - its much like MOP in energetics........

      "The medical application isn't comparable with the branch that would use the nacrein and lipid extracts. (No these would be destroyed during the heating process).

      and the predisposition of the patient (receptiveness to the cure) is as important as the components you may extract from the slow incineration process."

      Bhasma's seem to work regardless of the patients state of mind, most often patients (in Ayurveda) are not told what the remedy contains, much like a GP never sits down with a patient to discuss what's in the magic pills........ha
      These formulations have been around for about 2000 years + so if they were non-performance I imagine they would have ditched them by now.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Netera001 View Post
        Bhasma's seem to work regardless of the patients state of mind, most often patients (in Ayurveda) are not told what the remedy contains, much like a GP never sits down with a patient to discuss what's in the magic pills........ha
        These formulations have been around for about 2000 years + so if they were non-performance I imagine they would have ditched them by now.
        Most definitely. I would never implicate understanding the foundation of such ancient practices. I have heard feedback from acquaintances being uplifted by such method. Alas and despite having being exposed to a variety of culture and beliefs myself, I remain quite unsure of such practice, I have seen, I have tried and I have been left unconvinced...

        My point remains as receptiveness to a cure is not to be confined to "traditional" methods. I believe that the brain holds much more power than any mineral, or organic extract may it be done by a millennium old shared knowledge or by the state of art medical center.
        Thank you again for your very informative input. I shall try to find some reading materials about this topic.


        PS: My doctor does tell me what is in the pills that he/she would prescribe, I think it is just the duty of the patient to show interest in the process.

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        • #34
          Interesting posts. I think I am one of these stubborn patients that always wants to know what's in the pill and why. But then I also cancelled my health insurance and ditched all my doctors a couple of years back and am taking care of myself now. I do use some Ayurveda remedies, though. There is definitely a value in traditional methods, but it is often hard to decipher the mechanisms. And quality control is a problem.

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          • #35
            Alas, this is a massive problem, batch quality varies wildly..........its better to know the manufacturer or at least the supplier. Many remedies are actually quite easy to make, so its worth a go sometimes. Some Ayurvedic formulations are quite easy to produce, just a few herbs, along with oil or ghee.

            Getting back to pearls, I was contacted by a friend yesterday who was recently visited a factory in Nepal making pearl remedies, he said the pearls were sweet-water from China, so it seems they (at any rate) they show no preference for marine of freshwater.

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            • #36
              Thinking about it, fresh or sweet water pearls are more likely as ingredients in localised and old remedies since they are more likely to have been available to the local medicines maker in times when there was no international trade.
              Author:Pearls A Practical Guide published by Crowood Jan 2021
              www.pearlsapractical.guide

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              • #37
                So, is it possible for heavy metals to accumulate in pearl nacre? It would appear that might otherwise be a problem given the increasing pollution.

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                • #38
                  Pollution will kill off the mussels which would sort of solve the problem #biwa
                  Author:Pearls A Practical Guide published by Crowood Jan 2021
                  www.pearlsapractical.guide

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Ramona View Post
                    So, is it possible for heavy metals to accumulate in pearl nacre? It would appear that might otherwise be a problem given the increasing pollution.
                    Absolutely, if we are indeed talking about china you may consider a study (Trace metal distribution in sediments of the Pearl River Estuary and the surrounding coastal area, South China) lead (no pun intended) by the Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, The State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, and The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou.

                    Surface sediments and sediment cores collected at the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and its surrounding coastal area were analysed for total
                    metal concentrations, chemical partitioning, and Pb isotopic compositions. The distribution of Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn demonstrated a typical diffusion
                    pattern from the land to the direction of the sea. Two hotspots of trace metal contamination were located at the mixed zone between
                    freshwater and marine waters. The enrichment of metals in the sediments could be attributed to the deposition of the dissolved and particulate
                    trace metals in the water column at the estuarine area. The similar Pb isotopic signatures of the sediments at the PRE and its surrounding coastal
                    area offered strong evidence that the PRE was a major source of trace metals to the adjacent coastal area. Slightly lower 206Pb/207Pb ratios in the
                    coastal sediments may indicate other inputs of Pb in addition to the PRE sources, including the inputs from Hong Kong and other parts of the
                    region.
                    Conclusion was that: clear anthropogenic inputs of trace metals such as Co, Cr, Cu, Pb,and Zn of the sediments in the estuary were significantly higher than those at the coastal area.

                    Hence, getting pearls for mineral extraction in the 21st century may NOT be as good as it would have been if performed a few thousand years ago (as stated by Netera001 :These formulations have been around for about 2000 years +.)

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                    • #40
                      Just discussed this today with someone very experienced in the history and uses of the Tennessee freshwater pearl industry, and the Tennessee pearls have been used for a long time for medicinal etc, due to their higher purity, especially the natural ones . Although probably no pearls are as pollution free as decades ago, the freshwater in the USA areas may have at least slight higher purity from such.

                      Daddys Little Pearl
                      Daddys Little Pearl
                      Antiques Jewelry & Sacred Treasures

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Daddys Little Pearl View Post
                        Just discussed this today with someone very experienced in the history and uses of the Tennessee freshwater pearl industry, and the Tennessee pearls have been used for a long time for medicinal etc, due to their higher purity, especially the natural ones . Although probably no pearls are as pollution free as decades ago, the freshwater in the USA areas may have at least slight higher purity from such.

                        Daddys Little Pearl
                        This is very interesting, may we know if this is such as snake oil medicine or issued from documented uses (academic / medical)?
                        I wouldn't say that in our present society a single area in the world is "pollution free", pollution does not necessarily mean toxic waste although the general understanding of pollution nowadays is usually represented with black-smoke-belching towers and highly toxic waste being discarded into rivers (please excuse the overly simplistic image)... Any modification (how infinitesimal may it be ) of a biome is considered as a pollution, hence a modification in the chemical composition of (here to stay within the scope of the topic) the water.

                        Considering that the Tennessee is flowing some 1400km and pass through four States and that the local population of mussels has been subject to water pollution, invasive species and alteration of the ecosystem due to the creation of dams, I would be careful to name it a "pollution free". Not to throw the stone to any state in the USA but your affirmation would be well complemented with some academic studies (maybe from the AWCC ?) Consider the following:

                        Number four in our America's five most polluted river list is the Tennessee River. This river is also know as the Cherokee river, and is a tributary river of the Ohio river, so any pollution problems this river suffers, the Ohio river will most likely suffer it as well. Problems started in 1933 When Tennessee Valley Authority began building dams, restricting the river's free flow.
                        link1.

                        The recent discovery locally of pharmaceuticals in water is no exception, and learning more about the effects of new contaminants, as well as solutions, will take time — just as it has in previous decades when researchers and regulators tackled yesteryear’s “new” problems of raw sewage, industrial waste, PCBs and DDT, to name a few.

                        “This is going to follow the same scenario of other problems. We’ll start tracking and measuring, which will result in new controls and criteria (water quality standards,)” said Dr. Richard Urban, manager of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation’s Water Pollution Control Division in the Chattanooga field office.
                        link2.
                        Last edited by Cyril Roger Brossard; 01-24-2013, 03:48 AM.

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                        • #42
                          Was actually told this by a person involved with the Latendresse pearls historical operation here in Tennessee, who I met today and asked them about the uses in the past. And yes our rivers are also polluted, there are probably few in the world right now that are not. I do know the Tennessee river is probably less polluted than the Cumberland river here in Nashville (I won't drink the water here and have not for over 15 years). The TVA system , while contributing much to providing control for energy use etc of our abundant waters in Tennessee, also is quite careless at times such as when the Corps of Engineers released water upstream during the Nashville monsoon several years ago and flooded downtown Nashville, the Opryland Hotel, our largest shopping mall, and hundreds of homes, that one still in legal battles and may go to the courts. The sewage systems in Nashville have improved greatly over the years, but runoff from businesses on the rivers is still a problem as they don't want to follow the rules.
                          Having said this, I am not sure the pearl farms are actually on the Tennessee river. I do know one of the pearl farms is on Birdsong Creek, near Kentucky Lake. I have never seen that particular lake, but have been told by friends that fish there that it is one of the nicest in the state and absolutel beautiful. If Birdsong Creek is a tributary to the Tennessee river and being away from the large cities, I would assume it is at least somewhat if not significantly cleaner water, but this is only a guess. Many of our smaller tributary rivers in Tennessee are definitely cleaner with farm runoff being the main issue; with Tennessee still being an agricultural state.
                          From what I have been told, in addition to the Tennessee pearl industry suppling the tissue to other countries both historically and presently, there was use of these pearls in the past for the alternative medicine field to use a general term, both in the past and evidently in the present. Again I would probably never want to consume any of this myself, but other cultures make these remedies on a regular basis and evidently think they are safe and effective; one could wonder about the placebo effect.

                          Daddys Little Pearl
                          Daddys Little Pearl
                          Antiques Jewelry & Sacred Treasures

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