What kinds of pearls are these please?

It looks like a red abalone pearl, formed within a mantle perforation. It's very typical in this species. Without tangible provenance, it's impossible to determine natural or cultural origin as this phenomenon has been observed and described in either setting.
 
Dave, do you mean they are culturing red abalone pearls? I am referring to free pearls, not mabe.
Although come to think of it, I was not aware of red abalone cultured mabe either. (Paua abalone mabe, yes; red abalone mabe, no.)
 
Dave, do you mean they are culturing red abalone pearls? I am referring to free pearls, not mabe.
Although come to think of it, I was not aware of red abalone cultured mabe either. (Paua abalone mabe, yes; red abalone mabe, no.)
Though not red abalone, there are a couple of active abalone farms. Eyris Pearls for example. Likewise there are farms where abalone are raised for food. It's also possible to have originated by recreational divers, where trade in parts is not allowed.

Thus nearly impossible to determine origin.
 
That is what I was thinking too.

I remember those! Sometimes they were called keshi or Biwa.

I see a current eBay listing of dyed FW pearls that look like that ring, color wise:
 
Capture.JPG


Its a white pearl not a dyed black but this was on the first page of ebay here.
 
So rereading all of this, it seems to me we have more or less a consensus that all the pearls in this thread are likely cultured FWP, some dyed.

As cultured FWP are the most common pearls out there on the market, this would not be surprising.
 
Hi, im new here and from Sweden, so i do my best to right i English.
I have amazing pendant, but i dont know if it can be a mabe Pearl or Osman.
It have many hallmarks
925 import and S.
But the designer or where it comes from i cant found out. I askt in so many groups on Facebook but no body knows. Can some one please try to help me with my favourite pendant 😍
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20230702_212621_Gallery.jpg
    Screenshot_20230702_212621_Gallery.jpg
    579.4 KB · Views: 65
  • Screenshot_20230702_212711_Gallery.jpg
    Screenshot_20230702_212711_Gallery.jpg
    777.5 KB · Views: 67
  • Screenshot_20230702_212934_Gallery.jpg
    Screenshot_20230702_212934_Gallery.jpg
    928.9 KB · Views: 57
  • Screenshot_20230702_212908_Gallery.jpg
    Screenshot_20230702_212908_Gallery.jpg
    438 KB · Views: 59
  • Screenshot_20230702_212902_Gallery.jpg
    Screenshot_20230702_212902_Gallery.jpg
    576.4 KB · Views: 67
Good job on your English!! 925 is Sterling Silver. (Have you had to polish the silver? Does it tarnish?)
The pearl looks a lot like a "blister pearl" to me, as the backing appears to be a cut part of the shell that the pearl grew on.
See the definition:

Blister Pearl​

blis·ter pearl | ˈbli-stər ˈpər(-ə)l

noun

An irregularly shaped and hollow pearl, cut from the shell of an oyster

Typical pearls are grown inside the tissue of an oyster. Blister pearls, however, grow against the inside of an oyster’s shell. As a result, blister pearls must be cut out of an oyster. Additionally, rather than being round they are often hemispherical in shape and have a flat back. Though not shaped like a typical pearl, blister pearls are beautiful and very popular in pearl jewelry. They come in a wide array of colors, ranging from light pink to bluish hues. Some of them even have a rainbow-like gleam. In rare instances, blister pearls have a beautiful golden swirl. In order to prepare blister pearls for jewelry placement, special procedures must take place. After it is harvested from its oyster by being cut out of its shell with a circle-bit drill, its nucleus must be removed. Next, the blister pearl’s hole is filled with resin. Finally, the back of the pearl is capped with Mother of Pearl. After Blister pearls are harvested and prepared for jewelry placement, they are called Mabe pearls.

Of course, the experts on this site can offer a much more educated assessment. This is just my guess.
 
That is an osmena -- a polished nautilus shell-- not a pearl.

bella83 posted a thread about this yesterday:
 
That is an osmena -- a polished nautilus shell-- not a pearl.

bella83 posted a thread about this yesterday:
Cool! I'll learn more now.
 
Back
Top