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Favorite Pearl Single Strand Clasp?

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  • #76
    The falcon piece seems to function like an ending rather then clasp per see... keeping the rows of the necklace spread out and the weight of the front in balance (this balancing function of back endings on traditional beaded collars is even documented - now I have to remember in which text! It is a parable about the order of things... can't be too hard to find since there are only that many papyri translated anyway.)

    ... not that I wouldn't call this a 'clasp' - I really like the idea of necklaces tied in the back with tassels or ribbon (the gesture feels good; and the look exotic somehow not 'unfinished').

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    • #77
      Hi Valeria, you are right and so precise
      in Museum those pieces are called "clasps" anyway, I think in the meaning of a piece that allows to open and close the necklace.

      this balancing function of back endings on traditional beaded collars is even documented

      The necklaces were so heavy that they had a counter-weight in the back called "menkhet".
      Use of animal representations is related intended to take both strenght and protection from the animal, taken along by the person going to the kingdom of deaths ; which was utmost important in Egyptian conception of after-life (sorry litteral personal translation....)

      Ornament was very important in life of whealthy egyptians and a lot of jewellery has been found (since XIX century).
      These "clasps" have been used from - 2700 to -300 (about)

      BTW, haven't we the "knot" choice in the poll ?

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      • #78
        Now I get it! I kept picturing the head as a two part clasp that came apart somewhere. It's amazing to think how long it's survived.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by CLICLASP View Post
          ...
          in Museum those pieces are called "clasps" anyway, I think in the meaning of a piece that allows to open and close the necklace.
          'Bet that's right. It is quite amazing how much detail remains about Egyptian trivia - even necklace fastening!

          In the meantime, I managed to ID the respective text (part of the litany of daily rituals from the temple of Seti I at Abydos associated with the fastening of various types of necklaces) but don't have it in the house.

          Speaking of weighted necklaces, you wouldn't call the weight of a Menat necklace a 'clasp', would you? Very strange that one ...
          Last edited by Valeria101; 08-31-2008, 01:12 PM.

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          • #80
            Since that was not used to open and close, but as a counterweight for heavy collar necklace, it cannot be called a clasp, but interesting to know about , when whe talk on how to string and finish a necklace,
            Noticeable that some pearl necklaces by Cartier nowadays show a back ornament made of a bunch of pearls... but not as counterweight... or not yet ?

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            • #81
              Originally posted by Valeria101 View Post
              '....... ID the respective text (part of the litany of daily rituals from the temple of Seti I at Abydos associated with the fastening of various types of necklaces) ...
              .
              Looking forward to sharing this info when you get it

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              • #82
                Originally posted by borah View Post
                What brought you to Edinburgh? Was it pearl related?
                I took a year of during my studies. Not pearl related at all... I was in charge of maintenance in a hotel! and I worked in a deli on Dundas st. http://www.list.co.uk/place/100306-glass-thompson/ Best cheesecake and tarte au citron ever! but the chef has changed since then...
                P?cheur de Perles - London Theatre Tickets

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                • #83
                  Originally posted by CLICLASP View Post
                  Looking forward to sharing this info when you get it
                  I am near certain that the translation (and a good comentary) of the text is in:

                  Alexandre Moret, Le rituel du culte divin journalier en Egypte, Paris 1902

                  it will take a bit of digging to either find the book or an alternative source. I'll get back to this thread when I get the facts.

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