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Pearls in Myth

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  • Pearls in Myth

    The Power of Pearls throughout Mythology

    Pearls have long been attributed with having great powers and have been incorporated into the mythology of every culture that has encountered them. And no wonder! Given the natural pearls' rarity, as well as their mysterious beauty, who could argue that pearls might not indeed be a gift from the gods?

    Different Pearl Myths in Different Cultures

    In Hindu culture, pearls were associated with the Moon and were symbols of love and purity. Hindu texts say that Krishna discovered the first pearl, which he presented to his daughter on her wedding day.
    Parvati, Hindu god of War wearing a lavish pearl necklace.



    Pearls in Islamic Mythology

    Islamic tradition holds pearls in even higher regard. The Koran speaks of pearls as one of the great rewards found in Paradise, and the gem itself has become a symbol of perfection.

    Pearls in Christianity

    Christianity also adopted the pearl as a symbol of purity. Many of these ideas have come down to us in pearl lore and legend even today. For example, pearls are often associated with brides and weddings -a concept dating all the way back to Krishna and the wedding of his daughter. Pearls are also said to symbolize tears, to provide love and fertility, to symbolize purity, and to ward off evil.

    The Medicinal Power of Pearls in Mythology

    In addition -and deriving from their mythological significance -pearls have often been attributed medicinal qualities and used to treat a wide variety of physical ailments.

    Color in Pearl Mythology

    The colors of pearls also have sometimes been associated with certain qualities: black or gold with wealth, blue with love, pink with success.

    Related Articles and Forum Threads:
    Last edited by CortezPearls; 06-10-2021, 12:14 AM. Reason: edited text and added image
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