Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Freshwater Pearls vs Cultured Pearls

Collapse
X
Collapse
  •  

  • Freshwater Pearls vs Cultured Pearls

    Am I Getting Freshwater or Cultured Pearls?

    A common question faced by many pearl buyers today is whether a particular strand of pearls is composed of freshwater or cultured pearls. This question cannot have a definitive answer because freshwater pearls are in fact cultured pearls.

    Freshwater Pearls Are Cultured Pearls, But They Are Not Akoya

    The reason so many buyers distinguish cultured pearls from freshwater pearls, is because "cultured pearls" is a trade term still used by many today to describe akoya pearls. Although akoya pearls are cultured pearls, the process of nucleating them is the saltwater process and much different than freshwater cultured pearls.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	fine akoya pearl strand.jpg Views:	3 Size:	20.1 KB ID:	449858
    A fine strand of cultured akoya pearls courtesy of PearlParadise.com.

    Know the Origin of Your Cultured Pearls to Know Their Value

    This is important to understand when shopping for pearls because a seller of freshwater pearls can describe their product as cultured pearls. It is always important to identify the origin of the cultured pearls to make an informed purchase decision, because a strand of freshwater pearls will never be as valuable as a strand of equivalent quality akoya pearls.

    All Pearls Grown Today Are Cultured Pearls, But Not Necessarily Freshwater

    Any pearl that is grown and marketed today, (other than those from the Persian Gulf) are considered cultured pearls. This is because these pearls would not exist without human intervention.
    A freshwater pearl, although it may be solid nacre, is a cultured pearl where the mussel was nucleated with a piece of mantle tissue in their mantle tissue. All pearls cultured in saltwater are nucleated in the gonad with a piece of mantle tissue and a mother-of-pearl bead, which is how akoya pearls are nucleated.

    This is why akoya pearls are cultured pearls, but they are saltwater, not freshwater, and much different in appearance and more valuable than freshwater pearls.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	gemgrade-freshwater-vs-Akoya.jpg Views:	1 Size:	32.9 KB ID:	449859
    Gem grade freshwater (top) compared with fine akoya, courtesy of PearlsofJoy.com.


    Related Articles and Forum Threads:
    Last edited by CortezPearls; 03-16-2021, 12:19 AM.
      Posting comments is disabled.

    Categories

    Collapse

    article_tags

    Collapse

    Latest Articles

    Collapse

    • The Genus Pteria Scoppoli 1777
      by CortezPearls
      The family Pteriidae is composed of three or four genera, and pearl oysters belonging to the Pinctada and Pteria genera are -of course- the most important from our point of view.

      Taxonomy

      An old name for this species is Magnavicula, which means “Large Wing”, with the “new” -Pteria- name originating after the Greek word “Ptero” which translates into “wing”, hence the name of “Winged oysters”.

      These species are identified by...
      06-18-2021, 06:03 PM
    • The Sustainability Corner – Issue 2
      by CortezPearls
      Sustaining Life with Pearl Farming

      One of the most important aspects of pearl farming is its inherent ability to protect and create more life than the one that was available previously. And what do I mean by this? When you start a pearl farm in a location, you begin with a resource that has already been “pillaged & plundered”, probably for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. As an example, we have the pearl fisheries of the Persian Gulf -whose pearls were adorning...
      06-09-2021, 11:34 PM
    • A review: The History of Pearls in the Gulf of California, Mexico Part 4
      by CortezPearls
      ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACT OF THE CCCP

      There was a positive ecological aspect of this venture: the pearl farm itself acted as a gigantic breeding station for the pearl oysters. When you consider that this farm contained between 8 to 10 million pearl oysters and let us say that at least one-third of these had reached ****** maturity (2.6 to 6.6 million individuals), it is very evident to see the astounding positive impact that this commercial operation would have in restocking...
      05-27-2021, 01:40 AM
    • A review: The History of Pearls in the Gulf of California, Mexico Part 3
      by CortezPearls
      THE FIRST COMMERCIAL PEARL OYSTER FARM IN THE WORLD

      It is at this particular crossroad that we find a Mexican-French Medical Doctor by the name of Gastón Vivès, attempting what very none had tried before: initiate a commercially viable, large-scale pearl oyster farm to produce shell and pearls. The Vivès family owned a pearl fishing armada in La Paz, Baja California Sur, and they were experiencing diminishing profits every year, thus wanting to revert this trend we find Gastón Vivès...
      05-08-2021, 05:20 PM
    • A review: The History of Pearls in the Gulf of California, Mexico PART 2
      by CortezPearls
      The arrival of the Iberian Conquerors

      The Native Nations had no real interest in establishing a commercial venture in pearl fishing and we understand little to nothing of the way they fished for pearls, since most of the information was either lost or destroyed during the conquest of Mexico. The rich plunder of the Conquistadores was sent to Spain and later dispersed all over Europe. The most significant information we have on the subject comes from the period of colonization of northwestern...
      04-05-2021, 03:26 PM
    • A review: The History of Pearls in the Gulf of California, Mexico - PART 1
      by CortezPearls
      A review: The History of Pearls in the Gulf of California, Mexico
      By Douglas McLaurin-Moreno


      Since unrecorded time, man has obtained many bounties from the world’s oceans: food, shells, corals, sponges, seaweeds, and the most desirable of all of these were the beautiful mother-pf-pearl shells and their valuable treasure, Pearls.

      Mexico has four species of pearl oysters inhabiting its coasts, two -the larger sized- on the Pacific side: the Panamic Black Lip...
      03-18-2021, 03:04 PM
    Working...
    X