Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tahitian Pearls

Collapse
X
Collapse
  •  

  • Tahitian Pearls

    Tahitian Pearls Defined

    Tahitian pearls are bead-nucleated pearls grown in the gonad of the Pinctada margaritifera mollusk in French Polynesia.

    Before Contacting Us
    This page generates a lot of emails to us with questions about various Tahitian pearl sellers and their jewelry. Although we are an education website and here to help, we are volunteers and we can't respond to every email, every day.

    If you're seeking advice on dealers, please read this before contacting us. There are several Tahitian pearl specialists I would recommend. These dealers are known to the community and attend producer auctions, so their Tahitian pearls are genuine and untreated.

    Pearl Paradise is the largest and is owned by the co-author of the CPAA Pearls Certification Course and an editor of GIA's Pearls course. Pearls of Joy is also very well-known and highly respected. Finally, Pure Pearls specializes in Tahitian pearls and is one of the only female-owned pearl companies in the United States.

    There have been hundreds of conversations on our community forum about these companies (and others) if you would like to do more research.

    Caitlin Williams
    Pearl-Guide Admin
    Tahitian Pearls - Among the Most Beautiful in the World

    Tahitian pearls are produced in the black-lipped oyster Pinctada margaritifera, in and around Tahiti and the French Polynesian islands. This oyster itself is quite large - sometimes over 12 inches (30 cm) across and weighing as much as 10 pounds (4.5 Kg) - which often results in much larger-than-average pearls. The pearls are unique because of their natural dark colors.

    Most "black" Tahitian pearls are not actually black, but are instead silver, charcoal, or a multitude of colors with the dominant color being green. Truly black pearls are extremely rare.
    Tahitian Black Pearls


    Tahitian Pearls - Not really from Tahiti!

    Although Tahitian pearls are thought by many to be solely a product of Tahiti, this is in fact not true. Tahiti is the commercial center and trading hub for the bulk of the industry; however, Tahiti does not have any pearl farms located on the island. The farms are instead scattered throughout French Polynesia, as far east as the Gambier Islands, and beyond French Polynesia to the west into the Micronesian Islands. Australia, the Seychelles, and Vietnam have all produced black pearls as well, but those cannot be referred to as Tahitian pearls.

    Almost Fished to Extinction

    Not only are the pearls beautiful, but the black-lipped oyster's mother-of-pearl inner shell is also extremely attractive. By the early part of the 20th century, before conservation and repopulation efforts began, the oyster had been hunted to extinction for its shell alone.

    Tahitian Pearl Farming Begins

    Tahitian pearl farming has much later commercial origins than other types of cultured pearls. In the early 1960's a man by the name of Jean-Marie Domard began experimenting with the Pinctada margaritifera using Japanese culturing techniques. In 1962, Mr. Domard successfully nucleated five thousand oysters, and after 3 years harvested more than one thousand Tahitian pearls.



    Related Articles and Forum Threads:
    Last edited by CortezPearls; 06-10-2021, 01:23 AM.
      Posting comments is disabled.

    Categories

    Collapse

    article_tags

    Collapse

    There are no tags yet.

    Latest Articles

    Collapse

    • Pearls in the Web of Life - Part 3
      by CortezPearls
      Pearls in the Web of Life – Part 3

      In our last entry, where we learned that the outside of pearl oysters acts as a small ecosystem in itself, but now we will “dive deeper” into the oysters themselves to find that this pattern repeats itself -in a kind of Hermetic understanding of the “As is Above, is Below” law- but with different actors involved. And, if you ever had the opportunity to stare into a live and open pearl oyster, you would begin experiencing a...
      11-24-2021, 05:07 PM
    • Is the Pearl I found in my Clam/Oyster/Mussel Valuable?
      by CortezPearls
      This is a Special Educational entry, but I believe it may be of value to some of our new visitors; it originates from an email I received just a week ago, but I have received this type of e-mails many, many times before... so, I will take this opportunity to have this information to the widest audience possible. The e-mail would say something like this:



      And this is a remarkably interesting thing to find out, and each pearl would be a unique case, a unique study in itself....
      11-09-2021, 07:55 PM
    • DIY Project: Make your very own Pearls in Half!
      by CortezPearls
      You have probably seen those photos of beautiful pearls that have been "cut in half" so you can see their inner structure, and you probably wondered how those are worked: are they sawed off? maybe a machete?


      Well, wonder no more! This little video explains in detail how you can make your very own, very nice...pearls in half.

      You will need:
      1. Sandpaper sheets, one of each: 60 (very rough), 80 (medium grit) and 220 (fine grit, also called "water
      ...
      10-26-2021, 08:30 PM
    • Pearls in the Web of Life - Part 2
      by CortezPearls
      In a sense, pearl oysters might be a “small ecosystem” of their own, a self-contained biome where a tug of war ensues and leads to eventual stability. But why does this happen? And does it hurt the mollusk? One of my Marine Biology teachers -Dr Fernando Manrique, a friend of Jacques Cousteau- once told us that the Ocean was teeming with Life, and that the hardest thing for many lifeforms to find was an “available apartment”, a place to settle and that would help them avoid being tossed...
      10-11-2021, 06:12 PM
    • Mabe Pearl Grading - 7) Dome Height
      by CortezPearls
      Part of the beauty of a Mabe pearl comes from its “dome” (height). When a Mabe pearl displays a low dome it most closely resembles a piece of mother-of-pearl shell than an actual pearl. Unfortunately, many Mabe pearls today are grown too flat, due to the intrinsic characteristic of the host shell: Pinctada shells are usually flatter than Pteria shells (the shells being much more concave) which does not allow for the use of tall implants, since these will touch the opposite shell and will cause the...
      08-24-2021, 12:20 AM
    • Mabe Pearl Grading - 6) Nacre Quality
      by CortezPearls
      The most important factor here is nacre thickness. Many Mabe are cultured for short periods of time (4 months) to obtain the most perfect shape, but at the expense of their nacre thickness and durability. On the other hand, there are producers that grown them for too long (over 12 months) and end up having pearls that have thick nacre, but their shapes are not standardized, and they may display one or more of the surface imperfections we discussed in the previous paragraph. There is usually a middle...
      08-23-2021, 04:47 PM
    Working...
    X