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Metallic Edison Peal Smash for Those Who Enjoy a Good Pearl Smash

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  • #16
    How cool and fun! Almost reminds me of a nut!

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    • #17
      Gemandpearlover, thank you for this brave experiment!
      Just a point: the nacre of this kind of nice pearls is often thick, but not metallic in all the thickness, just a few layers separated by more or less pale colour nacre.
      I think these pearls are produced by farmers watching carefully the right moment to harvest, especially about water temperature, or/and a chemical factor (?).
      Then, pearls show a metallic surface of thin conchyoline effect as the last layer mussel has made before harvesting.
      Last edited by ericw; 03-02-2019, 09:55 PM.
      Pearls carver
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      • #18
        Originally posted by ericw View Post
        Gemandpearlover, thank you for this brave experiment!
        Just a point: the nacre of this kind of nice pearls is often thick, but not metallic in all the thickness, just a few layers separated by more or less pale colour nacre.
        I think these pearls are produced by farmers watching carefully the right moment to harvest, especially about water temperature, or/and a chemical factor (?).
        Then, pearls show a metallic surface of thin conchyoline effect as the last layer mussel has made before harvesting.
        Yes- the thin metallic nacre is exactly what I noticed on the pearls that I replaced. I at first thought all the nacre was very thin and I was seeing the bead because of missing nacre on those pearls. But like you explained- it was the metallic nacre that was thin. Might be pretty pearls today and not so pretty pearls in the future.

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        • #19
          I love science that includes hitting things with a hammer ! Well done !
          https://www.instagram.com/pearlzaustralia/?hl=en
          https://www.etsy.com/shop/pearlzaustralia

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          • #20
            Maybe you are right, Gemandpearlover, it's truly a question of day to harvest.
            I don't know how quickly the mussel produces conchyoline on its pearl, but perhaps even less than one day for such a thin layer to do this special enamel effect.
            More conchyoline would turn the pearl in strange tones of lavender/brown yellow, like many freshwater flameballs sold now.
            Pearls carver
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            • #21
              This thread is fascinating, especially Eric's notice of the thin layer of metallic nacre and the need for special harvest timing. Thanks, I love learning this stuff!
              Linda

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              • #22
                But is there actually special timing for harvest?

                Or is it just that only the pearls that come out looking metallic are sold, the others scrapped?

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                • #23
                  Good question Pearl Dreams.
                  I have read that freshwater pearls harvest is made when water is cold. Then, nacre has a better lustre.
                  I don't believe farmers let to the chance the choice of good pearls to get or not.
                  My opinion is they have found how to do mussels, and maybe oysters too, making this thin conchyoline layer, or only they have learnt when exactly it was coated.
                  What I am sure, is of the small number of these special layers, so coloured, inside the nacre.
                  For exemple, I had counted three, in all the 1mm thickness of a metallic katsumi pearl.
                  These layers are even so thin I can't work with.
                  Last edited by ericw; 03-04-2019, 05:57 PM.
                  Pearls carver
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                  • #24
                    really interesting Eric !
                    https://www.instagram.com/pearlzaustralia/?hl=en
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                    • #25
                      Thank you Katbran!
                      I really would like so much to meet pearls farmers.
                      Already I grow bonsaļs, as a passion, and I feel I would be on a right place to grow pearls...
                      Pearls carver
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                      • #26
                        Thanks for the experiment, GemandPearlLover. I always appreciate a good visual.
                        the nacre is roughly .0.8 to 1.2 mm thick.
                        Isn't that the nacre thickness of a Tahitian? Or was, before the standards were relaxed?
                        "Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by ennui View Post
                          ...
                          Isn't that the nacre thickness of a Tahitian? Or was, before the standards were relaxed?
                          Tahitians had to have a minimum of 0.8mm of nacre all over until July of 2017 when the new law went into effect.

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