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  1. #1

    Default cubitostrea sellaeformis

    This is a rather strange oyster from the Eocene about 45 million years ago. This example is from Little Stave Creek in Alamaba and I collected it as an undergraduate student in geology at Auburn University.

    Dr.Pearse our paleo-invertebrate professor said it was the most bizarre form the oyster ever took.

    This is a rare museum quality example and I thought the denizens of this forum might like a look. wonder what sort of pearls this critter might of made and yes there are some pimples on the inside shell that might be blisters.

    IMG_3921.jpgIMG_3923.jpgIMG_3924.jpgIMG_3925.jpgIMG_3926.jpgIMG_3927.jpg

  2. #2
    Pearl Scholar Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert pattye's Avatar
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    That's truly fascinating! And large! What a find! Thank you for sharing it.
    Pattye


    PatriciaSaabDesigns.etsy.com

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    SO MANY PEARLS, SO LITTLE TIME----

  3. #3
    Pearl Maven Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert Caitlin's Avatar
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    That is so interesting. I am glad you had the training to recognize it!
    Caitlin

    How to hand-knot pearls without a tool

    My avatar is a Sea of Cortez mabe pearl. One of a pair of Mexican handmade earrings.

  4. #4
    First-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member Cyril Roger Brossard's Avatar
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    Makes me think of Malleus malleus (Linnaeus, 1758), featuring similar anterior and posterior extensions of the dorsal margin. Although the palleal cavity of Cubitostrea sellaeformis is closer to the one found nowadays with the Genus Crassostrea.