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  1. #31
    PearlStruck.com
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    Default Fall 2007 Fashion

    Hi all,

    Although I've been a member of this forum for a few years, it's fairly recent that I started posting (though I feel like I know so many of you "regulars" from reading all that you've written). I love the idea of the whole Fashion and Style section of this forum, and I think so much information and many interesting ideas can be exchanged here.

    That being said, I'm wondering if anyone can help me out. Like many women, it's with a bit of an obsession that I keep up with new and upcoming fashion trends. In doing so, I've noticed a lot of 1940s influence for Fall 2007 designs (along with medieval, 1970s, punk, masculine, and futurism ). I'm trying to get a handle on what types of jewelry people were wearing in the 1940s and having a hard time with it. All I'm finding is flower lapel pins and some lucite pieces on ebay. Is anyone able to describe the materials being used or post images of jewelry from the 1940s?

    Thanks!

    Ann

  2. #32
    Casey.R
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    In the 40s "semi precious" gems were in, citine amethyst aquamarine, emerald cuts. I'm pretty sure it's because diamonds were being used in machinery during the war. Big and bold designs were popular. Lots of cocktail rings. I've noticed many of the wedding photos I've seen from that era the women are wearing suits instead of dresses.

  3. #33
    First-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member
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    The 1940s saw the rise of rose gold as platinum (very popular in the 20s & 30s) and it's less pricey alternative white-gold became scarce as they or their components went into the war effort (platinum is in catalytic convertors, which is why they are so darn expensive to replace, and if you read this a minute ago it said carborators, which was wrong). Cocktail rings with large, semi-precous stones became the thing to have. Very often the metal work is hollow to use as little of it as possible in a conservation effort.

    In costume jewelry, which also saw a rise since the depression put a cramp in gem buying and then the war, was often made up of base metals and leftover faux stones from generations past (Rhinestones were made in Europe so they had to use what was left around. Often 40s jewelry was called "retro" for this reason because it was forced to draw on the past.

    It was also IMO, the last decade before pre-fab ruined a lot of the old artistry.
    Last edited by aerinha; 07-10-2007 at 01:00 PM.

  4. #34
    Pearls, passionately
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    Default Check out these pearl styles: Priceless Imperfection

    Found this site looking for current-looking pearls; I don't know Zara Scoville, but really like her work.

    http://www.pricelessimperfection.com/

    Difficult to find pearl jewellery that is well made but not formal. What do you think of this?
    Kathleen C
    passagedesperles.blogspot.com
    pearls culture style

  5. #35
    Administrator Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert Kevin Canning's Avatar
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    hey Kathleen,

    Very organic bohemian looking jewelry, its definitely not suited for mass consumption but very interesting pieces. I think I would need to see the pieces on a model to make up mind though.
    Kevin Canning
    Pearls Of Joy
    www.PearlsOfJoy.com
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  6. #36
    PearlStruck.com
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    "The 1940s saw the rise of rose gold as platinum (very popular in the 20s & 30s) and it's less pricey alternative white-gold became scarce as they or their components went into the war effort"

    "Cocktail rings with large, semi-precous stones became the thing to have."

    Thanks for the great information. Where did you find all that? I'm starting to see where the 40s influence comes in with what we'll be seeing for fall. Hammered metals, pink gold, pave diamonds, chalcedony and crystals are supposed to be big this fall. And bold semi-precious stones.
    Last edited by PearlStruck.com; 07-10-2007 at 05:14 PM.

  7. #37
    PearlStruck.com
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    Hi Kathleen,

    The piece that is featured on the home page is really pretty and looks like it would be very versatile. It looks like some of the one-of-a-kind pieces I've sold in the past. I think it would look a bit less chunky (bohemian?) with some rose or cherry quartz or other gemstones and/or some clear faceted swarovski crystals. Very nice though, and it would probably look beautiful on.
    Last edited by PearlStruck.com; 07-10-2007 at 05:56 PM.

  8. #38
    Valeria101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathleen Conway
    Difficult to find pearl jewellery that is well made but not formal.
    Right that

    I am not sure the pieces (or just the images?) on the website are as very exciting as the concept behind them. But with no hope to see any up-close... what ca I say... The wire work on some (e.g, the Ni'hau necklace) reminds me of old fashioned barbed wire: do you think it is supposed to? That would really be a statement... of something... but of what ? Afraid to take that idea further.

    This could also be a matter of personal style and preference: ifor example, it so happens that my favorite pearl composition in the style (i.e. leisurely, 'irreverent' mix, with a story and an idea behind to enjoy along with the pearls) is not too far: THIS. A designer to watch too, IMO. [To whom it may concern: sorry to speaking my mind a tad too loud]

    More established ones? Paola Ferro and Donatella Pellini have some very exciting pearls... There should be many, many more, with such a versatile material.


    PS. Now that I am thinking... Guild.COM may hold a couple of useful addresses for casual pearls.
    Last edited by Valeria101; 07-10-2007 at 06:15 PM.

  9. #39
    PearlStruck.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathleen Conway
    Difficult to find pearl jewellery that is well made but not formal. What do you think of this?
    I also wanted to add that in my experience, the combination of sterling silver with baroques, stick pearls, coin pearls, rice pearls, etc., while inviting in price, can sometimes result in a low-end looking piece. The materials used are as important as how well a piece is put together (i.e. the wiring, etc).

  10. #40
    Pearl Knotting & Wire Expert Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert knotty panda's Avatar
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    Does this appeal to anyone? It's a carved pearl with an embedded diamond.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by knotty panda; 08-04-2007 at 05:52 AM.
    Pretty Panda pic by nlerner on her U.S. excursion last year, San Diego Zoo.[/SIZE][/SIZE]

  11. #41
    jerin
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    Quote Originally Posted by knotty panda
    Does this appeal to anyone? It's a carved pearl with an embedded diamond.
    Hi Knotty,

    it is very sophisticated and yes, I do like it very much!

  12. #42
    First-graft Pearl Mandy's Avatar
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    While the carving in the pearl is well done I really think pearls aren't meant to be carved like that. I mean, if they do do such a carving I can't imagine them doing it on a pearl that had exceptional luster or anything really remarkable about it. The attraction is definitely made for the diamond in the center.
    ~Mandy
    A semi-serious beader with a newfound love for pearls

  13. #43
    Valeria101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandy
    While the carving in the pearl ...The attraction is definitely made for the diamond in the center.

    Yeah... could only imagine a version meant to flatter the pearl instead, with the carved or faceted base out of a rock of befitting color.

    Even in that picture, I wouldn't have guessed the base was a carved pearl unless told. You could tell me it is lapis or low grade sapphire just the same. And that could accomodate a small pearl with a story. Perhaps one like THIS, perhaps.


    Now, the idea is not new, I just can't say to have seen allot of great examples, especially some using pearls worthy of being showcased on their own.

    E.G - THIS ONE: nice idea and example of modern jade carving, but measly pearl




    And an attempt to go one better along this line (IMO), from Freeform:




    Do you know of other of the like ?
    Last edited by Valeria101; 08-05-2007 at 02:20 PM.

  14. #44
    CLICLASP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandy
    While the carving in the pearl is well done I really think pearls aren't meant to be carved like that. I mean, if they do do such a carving I can't imagine them doing it on a pearl that had exceptional luster or anything really remarkable about it. The attraction is definitely made for the diamond in the center.

    Hello
    I just get a carved pearl
    It is called marquisian pearl, coming from Tahiti where it is made according to a traditional pattern
    A perfectly round pearl is necessary, but not an exceptional luster is required due to carving purpose.
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  15. #45
    New Member cyens's Avatar
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    I think this is the carved shell,
    But the other picture looked like a pearl cut in half.

    I cut a few freshwater pearls in half because I wanted to see how they looked like inside when they were dyed, if the dye went all the way through, if they had beads inside and so forth.
    Most dyed freshwater pearls look like the carved pearl with a diamond inside, but once you cut it in half, all the layers become brittle and the whole thing falls apart layer after layer...