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  1. #1
    First-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member
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    Default How I made the golden pearl and sapphire necklace.

    I am posting a description below. I do not know how clear it is. I will add some labeled photographs and answer any questions after we return from a cruise. We are leaving soon, so I must go pack--I've put that off as long as I can. (Hate packing)

    Here goes:

    Materials:

    1. BASE:
    nylon coated beading wire. I had several diameters on hand because I had to test the holes of the beads to determine tolerance. I ended up using (in inches) .010 and .012. I tried at first to use the .012 for both strands, but discovered that at least one strand had to be .010 because the little diamonds had such small holes.

    Because of use of the very hard stones in this necklace it was really not feasible to use silk or similar options. I wanted to use the .012 because I was able to find accuflex in that width. Other brands with the 49 strand option start at .013, which was too tight for the sapphire holes. Sounds like a small difference but the .012 was fine for all, but the .013 would not work with a few beads. (I discovered that I needed to test a fairly large sample of beads before starting to make sure I had enough beads that I could actually string.)

    In the necklace the wire has to go through any sapphire bead once, but both wires have to pass through each of the four side pearls, and one of the wires has to pass through the diamond bead holes once and the central pearl twice. In this necklace the .010 wire, which I could obtain only in 19 or 21 strands, was used to pass through the diamond and the central drop pearl.

    I used two strands of the nylon covered wire. The total length of my necklace (hooked ) is 15.5 inches, and I made a two inch extender.

    I am sure that experienced beaders already know this but I have discovered the hard way that it is good to be generous with the cut. I cut the wires about 1/3 longer than the planned length, and cut the wire that was used for the drop about 1 to 2 inches longer.

    Because so much is done on the wires, and two wires are used in a coordinated fashion, I will in the future use something to hold the unworked side together such as a beadwire holder.

    2. WIRE . In the central section I wanted to add a third top strand of sapphires. I used 18k gold 28 guage half hard wire—I believe I cut about 6 inches for this section. It spans about 2.5 inches, but had to be slightly curved and wrapped on each side around the beading wires (more about this below)..
    This wire was used to add to the central section of the necklace a third strand of sapphires. The sapphires are “strung” on 18k gold wire to form a thicker strand and to allow the larger sapphires to cluster around the central pearl.

    3. SAPPHIRES: approx. 280 small sapphire faceted briolettes (these varied from about 3.5 to 5 mm in length); 7 larger sapphire briolettes

    4. DIAMONDS: 2 diamond faceted beads (fat briolettes)

    5. GOLD BEADS: 10 gold beads (mine were about 5,5 mm, and had a stringing hole of approximately 2mm); 6 3 to 3.5 mm barrel beads (relatively large hole); approximately 20 2mm, round gold beads with large hole (these are important and I try to have a selection of 2 to 3mm large hole beads to “test” for hole size—also good to have a few extra because they are easily crushed or dropped!!!); I also used 4 slightly larger barrel beads toward the clasp. I used 2mm crimp beads as well. I used on the bottom of the drop pearl a small round bead with somewhat of a barrel shape—it is probably about 2-3 mm. The barrel shape was good for connecting the diamond drop to the pearl.
    I also used small gold spacers on the top of the drop pearl, and around the flanking pearls, however, I ran out of spacers, and being somewhat impatient, did not wait for more—so did not use them around the two end pearls. However, I made sure that the gold beads touching the pearls had a smooth, blunt edge there.

    6. PEARLS: I used 4 near round (9.5 to 10 mm) and one ringed drop (about 12.5 mm). The necklace would have been easier to make if I had strung the central pearl in line and not created a drop, so if I repeat this design I will consider using a fifth pearl that would work in line rather than as a drop.

    7. Clasp, I used a hook clasp.


    As a preface I will give you a simple rule of thumb for calculating the number of sapphires that you need to make the “chain” that you see connecting the two upper pearls on each side, and then connecting the end pearls to the gold beads that lead to the clasp. You will need 24-26 per inch (12-13 on each parallel strand). The “chain between the pearls is about 2 inches in length.

    How I made the necklace:

    Central part

    1. The pearl drop:

    Starting in the center on the wire that would pass through the central drop pearl twice and the diamond once, I put the diamond briolette dangle (that sits below the pearl) on the wire.

    I center the diamond and brought each side of the wire through the small barrel bead so that the briolette was dangling on the center of the wire with the barrel bead holding it as a drop,

    I then passed both sides of the wire through the central pearl (the barrel bead anchors the wire so that it is not chaffing the sides of the pearl hole).

    Where the wire ends emerge on the top of the pearl, I placed e a spacer so that both ends of the wire also pass through the spacer.


    2. I then strung the central section of the lower wire with the drop .

    I place one of the small barrel beads followed by a 2mm round bead on each side of the wire where the wire emerged from the spacer. It is at this point that thehe wire must bend at an angle greater than 90 degrees between the spacer and the barrel bead to transition from the vertical drop section back to the strand . I had to experiment to see what configuration of beads best permitted flexibility of angle but also covered the wire best.

    I then passed the wire through one of the larger beads (for me the 5.5 mm beads with the 2mm hole) on each side so that the 2mm bead was sitting next to the larger bead. (At this point I had to be very careful to make sure that the little bead did not get “swallowed” by the larger bead—it can happen!!]
    After the larger bead I strung 12 or 13 of the smaller sapphire briolettes onto the wire

    Note: in the next step I added the second wire and completing the central section of that wire—here it would have been a good idea to have either beadwire holders or hemostats to anchor the wires and the completed section of the lower wire. I did not do this and it was a XXXXXX!!!!!!


    3. Completing the central section of the second wire—

    This contains some of the beads that are above the drop.

    My center bead on this wire was the second diamond bead

    On either side I added two of the larger sapphire briolettes, so the second wire contains four sapphire briolettes and the central diamond bead that sits just above the drop.

    Then on each side I passed the second wire through the larger bead that was already strung on the first wire—this is the first connection for the two wires.

    Following the larger gold bead, I strung 12 or 13 of the smaller sapphire briolettes on the second wire. At this point there were two parallel strings of smaller briolettes strung after each of those larger gold beads.

    I pulled wires firmly (but not too tight)—so they began to naturally twist slightly together with no visible gaps. (This actually took some practice, but became easier as I got the “feel” of it.) The trick was securing them while I worked on the other side . I finally used a clip to hold them while I worked on the opposite side, but I definitely in the market for something that works better here!

    4. Third strand: I then added the gold wire to the central section—this added a third line of sapphires to the central necklace.

    Beginning in the center of the gold wire I strung the remaining three larger sapphires, separating each with a 2 mm bead an alternating sapphire, bead, sapphire, bead, sapphire. I discovered that I needed the beads as filler as I curved the wire slightly over the lower sections.

    On each side, I then ran the end of the gold wire through the larger bead that was already strung on the lower strands.

    On each side, I then strung 12-13 of the smaller sapphire briolettes on the gold wire. These also gently curved over the parallel sections of small sapphires on the lower wires.

    I had to work with these strands again so that everything was aligned. Again, hemostats would have been a great help here.

    On each side I wrapped the gold wire several times around the beading wires at the end of the sapphires on the lower two wires. I had to be careful not pull the gold wire so tightly that there was stress on the wire. I wanted the wrap to be secure but not so tight that it cut the nylon coating. I clipped excess wire and tucked the end.

    On each side, I strung another larger bead (I used the 5.5 mm with the 2mm hole) over both beading wires and pulled gently until it covered the wrap. I worked with it until the bead fit snugly and completely covered the wrapped section.


    At this point, I had to go back and make adjustments so that the three strands were in proper positions with no obvious gaps—not too tight, not too loose. Very time consuming.
    Last edited by claudenancy; 11-30-2008 at 08:13 PM.

  2. #2
    First-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member
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    Default rest of the story

    The good news here is that the rest of the necklace was a breeze—comparatively at least!!

    5. The rest of the necklace:

    This is what I did on each side:

    a. added spacer and first side pearl, and another 5.5 gold bead over both beading wires
    b. on each separate beading wire added 12 to 13 smaller sapphire briolettes
    c. strung a 2mm gold bead over both wires. I discovered that the wires needed to be pulled together every inch in order for the strands to hang properly.
    d. repeated step b,
    e. strung one of the 5.5m gold beads, followed by a pearl, another 5.5 mm gold bead over both wires
    f. repeated step b, and c twice to add two inches of sapphires before I finished the end of the necklace with gold beads. ( Note that I could have added one inch in length on each side by then repeating b and c again)
    g. strung over both wires one of the larger gold barrel beads and another 2mm gold bead
    h. added three smaller sapphire briolettes (2 on one of the wires, l on the other. This step is really not necessary, I just liked the look near the end of the necklace.
    i. strung over both wires a 2mm round bead, another larger, barrel bead, another 2mm barrel bead, the crimp, and then a smaller barrel bead.

    j. I then added the clasp, passing the ends of two wires through the prior barrel bead, the crimp and the remainder of the gold beads so that the wires were clipped just over the three sapphire briolettes. I found that the barrel beads were quite snug and seemed to hold the wires quite firmly in place. After carefully crimping, I was finished!!!

    The advantage of the barrel beads on either side of the crimp is that the crimp looks like part of the bead, and also the end of the barrel bead is shaped so that the wire that wraps over the clasp ring virtually vanishes.

    I would love to use French wire, but have only found it in base metal. What are your sources for gold or gold filled?
    Last edited by claudenancy; 11-30-2008 at 08:22 PM.

  3. #3
    Natural Pearl Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert dkan 168's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by claudenancy View Post
    I would love to use French wire, but have only found it in base metal. What are your sources for gold or gold filled?
    I can only find silver or gold plated French wire or gimp, sorry.

    Can't wait to see the finished article!

    DK
    Treat every life situation like a dog: if you can't play with it, eat it, or hump it, p1$$ on it and walk away

  4. #4
    First-graft Pearl
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    I've only been able to find sterling silver and vermeil french wire from Fire Mountain Gems. They have good customer service but avoid their gem strands, they're not very high quality and they're retail.

    http://www.firemountaingems.com/sear...il+french+wire

    http://www.firemountaingems.com/sear...ng+french+wire

  5. #5
    First-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member
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    Thanks for the information on french wire. I will check these out.

    I should have said that the necklace referenced here is pictured and discussed in the "My latest pearl project" thread in the "Show us your pearls forum".

    https://www.pearl-guide.com/forum/sh...html#post46000


    I will try to take better pics when we return.

  6. #6
    First-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member
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    Finally here is a neck shot. I actually restrung part of the necklace so that the third sapphire row, which is only in the center part of the necklace between the drop and the first pearl on either side, is now strung on beading wire instead of 18k gold 28 guage wire. This third strand is crimped on each side under the larger gold bead, which fortunately had a hole of sufficient size to slip over the crimp plus a 2mm gold bead which substitutes for a ring. It now drapes much better than before.

    I also shortened it by less than one inch so it could be worn as a (near) choker. It is shown here at (near) choker length, but can still be worn at a longer length with a matching extender that I made.
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  7. #7
    Pearlista Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert GemGeek's Avatar
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    Looks terrific!

  8. #8
    Pearl Maven Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert Caitlin's Avatar
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    My monitor is hard to see, but it looks very elegant-suitable for the opera.
    Caitlin

    How to hand-knot pearls without a tool

    My avatar is a Sea of Cortez mabe pearl. One of a pair of Mexican handmade earrings.

  9. #9
    Pearl Scholar Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert pattye's Avatar
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    The sparkle and shading of colors of sapphire are truly lovely! Thanks for giving us the neck shot!
    Pattye


    PatriciaSaabDesigns.etsy.com

    facebook.com/PatriciaSaabDesigns

    SO MANY PEARLS, SO LITTLE TIME----

  10. #10
    Consumer Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert kelluvpearls's Avatar
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    Love the colours, the necklace looks more substantial on your neck than the photos in the other post.

  11. #11
    Natural Pearl Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert Nerida's Avatar
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    That is just beautiful. Thanks for the neck shot - it is always the best perspective!

  12. #12
    First-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member
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    Hi everyone and thank you for your kind comments. I so enjoy the neck shots posted on the forum and do understand that they are very desirable, even necessary, to really have an accurate idea of the relative size and impact of the jewelry.

    For a neck shot, I have to catch my husband with his camera and convince him to snap a few neck shots of the pieces that I make. I guess I need a good tripod.

    I have only two other neck shots of pieces that I made. I will post both here. One is a necklace of natural silver akoya, sapphire, and tanzanite necklace that I previously posted on another thread (but no neck shot), the other (since this is the lowly beaders section) does not include pearls, but was made as an experiment with some techniques and designs that interested me. It was done to show case an old opal that I had since the early 90s. THe opal is a story in itself, and hard to photograph. THe necklace is certainly not made to wear everyday, but is was an experiment from which I learned alot.

    The ring that is seen on the right hand side of the opal necklace is from an extender that I failed to remove in the haste to get ready to have the picture taken. (My husband was in a big hurry to leave on a field trip to snap nature pictures.)

    I have learned so much and been so inspired by the beautiful creations that this group has created. THanks!

    Beth
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  13. #13
    Second-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member boo's Avatar
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    Wow - they are both spectacular! That opal is amazing, especially considering the difficulty in photographing them. And as a blues girl, I am absolutely swooning over the akoya, sapphire and tanzanite.

  14. #14
    Pearlista Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert GemGeek's Avatar
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    I agree with Boo - spectacular! Excellent work and great color-sense. Thanks so much.

  15. #15
    First-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member
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    Hi Boo and Blaire, and thanks. Boo, I have been lusting over your new Tahitians and your fwp, Tahitian combination too. I am definitely saving my pennies (well, more than that I hope) for some like that--you convinced me--they are definitely at the top of my list!

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    By claudenancy in forum Show Us Your Pearls!
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    Last Post: 11-30-2008, 02:25 AM