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  1. #16
    Second-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member ericw's Avatar
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    Katbran, formaldehyde is a true poison, for humans and environment. That's why it is banned in Europe, I don't know what EU papers you have read about that ( In France, it's obligatory label show a skull).
    You tell that body itself produce formaldehyde... Yes, in case of drinking too much alcohol, for a long time, ethanol metabolism produce formaldehyde which destroys liver, for resulted in death...
    A long time ago, I received formaldehyde in eyes, during a scientific handling : it was an experiment I don't wish anyone. Luckily, It was enough water to wash my eyes at the right time, if not, I lost the sight.
    One more time, molluscs are preserved in 70 ethanol, it's the best way known for that by scientific practice, so, there are no valid reasons to put formaldehyde in these oysters, except nonsense.
    Just a screenshot (if you want, I can traduce for you, but, in sum, formaldehyde is a full ****):
    Attachment 56358
    Last edited by ericw; 11-01-2017 at 01:02 PM.

  2. #17
    Museum Pearl Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert JerseyPearl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katbran View Post
    I think JP is quite correct, from reading the medical journal reports and the EU papers it does appear that it's only been a possible problem for people that have been exposed over a long period of time..like in factories etc. The stuff is absolutely everywhere and in everything from glues and resins to car parts..its in medicines and vaccines..it's antibacterial. Your body produces it. So a bit of very diluted exposure, short of undiluted amounts on your skin, seems very unlikely to cause any problems.
    Kat, I was actually saying the more exposure you have, the greater the risks...but that doesn't mean a single exposure isn't harmful. Unfortunately, all it takes is once to increase that risk...and the more times you are exposed the greater that risk becomes. It is classified as a probable carcinogen here in the states, which means that you should not be using the stuff without proper protection. A concentration as what was found in the oyster is not ambient level...it is very high.
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  3. #18
    Natural Pearl Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert lilliefuzzysocks's Avatar
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    Oyster formalin 7.7% This report formalin 8%. Hostesses do this for hours per week on their facebook lives, some more than a hundred at a show. I've only seen a few wear gloves. It would seem the Section 11: chronic exposure warnings on page three would be appropriate for this occupation. No one is addressing what happens when the fun ends. Where does this hazardous waste end up?
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  4. #19
    Pearl Enthusiast Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert Pearl Dreams's Avatar
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    Good point-- all that formaldehyde going into the waste water system-- what does it contaminate down the line?

  5. #20
    Museum Pearl Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert JerseyPearl's Avatar
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    https://www.cpsc.gov/PageFiles/12191...dehyde-725.pdf
    https://www.epa.gov/formaldehyde/fac...t-formaldehyde

    And please do keep in mind that the current Administration at the USEPA has scrubbed their website of a great number of materials
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  6. #21
    Second-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member ericw's Avatar
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    More : In France, safety services considere that formaldehyde can cause genetic anomalies... and it's very TOXIC for all water life!
    Last edited by ericw; 11-01-2017 at 02:25 PM.

  7. #22
    First-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member
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    I work in a hospital in the US. Recently a small jar of formalin fell to the floor in the pathology department and broke . It was regarded as a major hazardous materials spill and had to be reviewed by the hospital safety committee and reported to the state. All employees who were in the area had to report to employee health and were given follow up monitoring plans.

  8. #23
    Rare Pearl Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert CathyKeshi's Avatar
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    The original post says 2 oysters were tested, and the first one was negative for formaldehyde/formalin. I'd be interested to know if the testing showed what that first oyster was preserved with? Was testing done on either for bacteria etc., or just for formaldehyde/formalin? Dangerous materials, good warnings.
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  9. #24
    Museum Pearl Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert
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    Quote Originally Posted by JerseyPearl View Post
    Kat, I was actually saying the more exposure you have, the greater the risks...but that doesn't mean a single exposure isn't harmful. Unfortunately, all it takes is once to increase that risk...and the more times you are exposed the greater that risk becomes. It is classified as a probable carcinogen here in the states, which means that you should not be using the stuff without proper protection. A concentration as what was found in the oyster is not ambient level...it is very high.
    You have cleared it up for me I was in a bit of a rush and should have taken a bit more care in what I was saying. I agree with you and that's basically where I was going or trying to go..
    No product or process that has potential long term effects can be considered completely safe even in short term use. When I sat on the Childrens hospital Human Research Ethics Committee for many years we always had issues like this where it needed to be spelled out that certain treatments or processes have no recognised 'safe' levels. Such as X-Rays. We don't really think about it ... but there is no safe level of radiation and somewhere in the various papers you sign it's going to say that. One X-ray increases your risk .. Each additional x ray adds to the risk. No one can say that any specific number of X-rays are safe...therefore non are safe.

    There is now research that shows potential links between hair dyes and breast cancer in women. Up to a 14% increase in the disease amongst women who dye their hair. More research will be done, but hair dye was a source of known carcinogens for a long time. They have removed some but not all.

    I'm not saying Formaldehyde is safe...it's toxic ... and the problem with the pearl parties seems to be in the concentration used in the Oysters. I can well imagine the slap dash method of preserving them that is used in these Chinese factories. I'm sure that the concentration varies wildly from batch to batch and within each batch. That is certainly something that should be looked at. I have to assume that the UK has approved the importation of these with the knowledge that some Formaldahyde was being used as a preservative. Perhaps Wendy has some insight as to what information would need to be provided. I'd be shocked if they didn't have to disclose all information on dead shellfish.

    Most certainly everyone who will be handling these oysters should be made aware of the variation in the levels of the chemical and urges to take precautions.

    As for Erics comments about alcohol and Formaldehyde in the human body being a result of alcohol... I have no idea about that. But research from the FDA says that Formaldehyde is "produced naturally in the human body and is essential in the production of certain amino acids. "

  10. #25

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    Yes formaldehyde is found in everyday life, but this is at relatively low levels. The contents of the oyster that tested positive was very high. Even the analyst that tested the oysters was shocked at such a high reading. While we would have liked to have tested more oysters, and for more things, the girls and I running the page are just average working class girls. The testing was very expensive and came out of our own pockets. To test just for formaldehyde in 2 oysters was just over 500!
    We chose to test for formaldehyde as we had seen lots of chatter online that it was a possibility, but could find nothing definitive. This was also the most toxic thing we had heard was in them. Having seen many party hosts appearing to have symptoms that would be consistent with being in contact with formaldehyde, we wanted to make this test our priority. We understand that this by no means enough testing. But could not get the UK trading standards etc to take notice as what we were trying to warn of was just hearsay. Having passed these results to them they are now taking it very seriously. They have the funds to do much more extensive testing than we do.
    We also believe that the other oyster was preserved in 97% ethanol, 1% methanol and 2%water. We obtained this information from a wholesaler who says this is how hers are preserved, although without testing it would be difficult to know how true this is. We have informed trading standards of this and they will no doubt check this too.
    Last edited by Jwymark; 11-02-2017 at 09:42 AM.

  11. #26
    Second-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member ericw's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Katbran;195540]You have cleared it up for me I was in a bit of a rush and should have taken a bit more care in what I was saying. I agree with you and that's basically where I was going or trying to go..

    I think the solution is simple : to get any guarantees from suppliers that their oysters are preserved in ethanol (which is anyway the right manner to do), without formaldehyde.
    Without these covenants, no orders, and suppliers will quickly understand where is their own interest.
    Edit : maybe a few customs states are more picky with alcohol import than any other chemicals, because they might be more knowledgeable about tax questions than people health... To answer, 70% alcohol is not the strongest, but now it's well known by scientifics that it is the right percentage for the best of bactericidal effect, against strong alcohol as that was believing before.
    Last edited by ericw; 11-02-2017 at 06:13 PM.

  12. #27
    Museum Pearl Senior Pearl-Guide.com Pearl Expert
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    True, there needs to be a change in the regulations if thats where the practice is best halted. To add a requirement that the oysters be preserved using a safer material in order to be shipped into the country.

  13. #28
    Second-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member ericw's Avatar
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    And I add that to hope only a movement from authorities can take a long time, may also produce total prohibition, not appropriate, as opposed to the quick efficiency of a massive buyers' reaction.
    Last edited by ericw; 11-02-2017 at 06:08 PM.

  14. #29
    Second-graft Pearl Senior Guide Member ericw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pearlescence View Post
    I suspect that this sort of stuff is simply banned in the EU. One more reason why we should not be leaving
    Sorry, sure I have not well understood your phrase, Pearlescence. I am talking about a reaction from retailers, in the world, first.

  15. #30

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    Unfortunately Eric those selling these oysters are aware of the problem but are too greedy to care. Which means that the only option we have is to wait for the authorities to act. This will take some time as they will have to do more extensive testing than we were able to do.

    Pearlescence, we are still a part of the EU now and yet these oysters are still here. So I don't think in or out will actually make a difference to the problem.

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