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what are these tadpole pearls?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by jshepherd
    I disagree. Both of the photos are of freshwater pearls. The link Susan posted with the name Okoya is freshwater without question. Baroque Akoya look very different.
    It seems that I spoke before looking at the picture or doing some investigation. It seems that the word Okoya is being used a lot in conjunction with Freshwater pearls (especially on eBay). Evidently this term is being used with bead nucleated Freshwater pearls (Freshwater pearls that are cultured in the same manner as Akoya - thus Okoya).

    I may be wrong as I am not really familiar with this term (and why I just thought is was a misprint at first glance)...

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    • #17
      Thank you Carol. At least I now understand Okoya is another name for firetail pearls. At least in some circles.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Susan
        Can you get freshwater Baroques in this Okoya/fireball shape without the bead?
        If so how big?
        If not are we perhaps talking about baroque shapes in tissue nucleated freshwater (like Zeide's flintstone necklace) being common and large say 12mm upwards and numerous or not?
        I personally love the idea of a necklace in these fireball freshwater pearls in a large size- but would prefer them not to have the shell nucleous if at all possible.
        In that particular shape the chances are not very good. In a tissue nucleated freshwater you are looking for a shape of chance, but with the bead nucleated material that particular shape is very consistent and distinct. It is similar to the freeform South Sea baroque pearl shape.
        http://www.pearlparadise.com/detail.aspx?ID=426

        If you are interested in that type of shape, it would be easiest for you to go with the bead nucleated variety. Although you may eventually find something very similar with tissue nucleated.
        Last edited by jshepherd; 09-26-2006, 06:02 PM.
        Jeremy Shepherd
        President and Founder
        PearlParadise.com, Inc.
        The PearlParadise.com YouTube Channel
        PearlParadise.com on Flickr
        PearlParadise.com on Facebook
        Some of My Favorite Pearly Finds on Instagram

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        • #19
          Hi Susan,

          My tissue-only nucleated drops are a minimum of 12mm and a maximum of 14.4mm measured perpendicular to the drill hole and a minimum of 14mm and a maximum of 17.1mm measured hole-to-hole. I have not seen many of those around but some do pop up every now and then. How much they cost always depends on who is selling them and where. I do not know a going market rate, but surely Jeremy should know.

          Zeide

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          • #20
            Not really, actually. When the market was flooded with baroques we went nearly exclusively to high-end rounds to carve a niche and to avoid competing with the billions of low-end pearls and thousands of low-end pearl dealers on the market. I often travel to Zhuji with friends of mine in the beading industry, and their average costs for baroques go from about $15US per kilo and up. I am sure that certain premium strands could cost substantially more, however. These would likely either be loose matched outside of a factory, or sold as a single piece from a factory.
            I do not personally buy any of those pearls unless I am doing someone a favor. In the end they spend about $10k US for every $100k US that I spend with a converse amount of volume.
            Jeremy Shepherd
            President and Founder
            PearlParadise.com, Inc.
            The PearlParadise.com YouTube Channel
            PearlParadise.com on Flickr
            PearlParadise.com on Facebook
            Some of My Favorite Pearly Finds on Instagram

            Comment

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